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Survivalist Wish List

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Keeping yourself alive in the outdoors is mostly a matter of putting to work what's between your ears, and sometimes reaching down deep to get out of a tough situation. But having the right survival gear along doesn't hurt. Here is a roundup of equipment, new this year, that you'll want to have with you if things run amok.

Water Purifier
MSR MIOX This compact, lightweight device is the best I've found for killing organic waterborne contaminants. Prime with a quarter teaspoon of untreated water, add salt to a special compartment, push a button to send an electric charge and you get a cocktail that is deadly to virus, bacteria, giardia and cryptosporidia. ($130; 800-531-9531; msrcorp.com)

Signal Device
Power Flare About the size and shape of a hockey puck, this unit will flash its brilliant red LEDs for up to 100 hours. It can be switched off to preserve battery power and can be programmed with a variety of flash sequences, including SOS. Run a rope through its eyelet and hang it in a tree. ($90; 408-323-2379; powerflare.com)

Flashlight
Coast Tac Torch Recon
Developed for the military, this thumb-sized 6-LED flashlight has four switches-one for brilliant white light and one each for red, green and blue lights that help preserve night vision or track a blood trail. It is powered for up to 50 hours by three AAA batteries and comes with a lanyard. ($60; 800-426-5858; coastcutlery.com)

Knife
Gerber LMF II Tactical Knife With its 5-inch Sandvik Steel blade, this is a survival knife on steroids. The broad spine can be hammered against when cutting or splitting wood, and an aggressively serrated section of blade works well for sawing. The steel buttcap can be used as a hammer or a blunt weapon. The handle is configured so it can be lashed to a pole when you want to use the knife as a spear, and the comfortable, non-slip grip fills the hand. ($100; 800-950-6161; gerbergear.com)

Fire Starter
Brunton Helios Stormproof Lighter
Windproof in 80 mph storms, the refillable butane lighter is armor-clad for ruggedness and can be worn on a lanyard so cold, fumbling fingers won't lose it. Search and rescue teams carry this lighter. ($60; 800-443-4871; brunton.com)

GPS
Garmin Rino 130 with built-in 2-way radio
This is an all-in-one handheld GPS and FRS/ GMRS radio with a range of up to 5 miles. When you contact someone who also has one of these, he receives your coordinates. The Rino includes an electronic compass, barometric sensor and weather receiver. ($375; 913-397-8200; garmin.com)

Clothing
ex officio Buzz Off This line of clothing is pretreated with a benign (to humans) repellent that drives away mosquitoes, flies, gnats and ticks. The line includes hats, socks and everything in between. From $16 for socks to $60 for shirts or pants. (800-664-7303; exofficio.com)

Backpack
Columbia Ridge Runner When you need to make your escape, the Ridge Runner is a good way to carry your gear. It features heavy-duty in-line skate wheels with sealed bearings, so you don't have to shoulder it when hauling gun or rod cases. The pack is shaped like, and functions as, a 5,500-cubic-inch backpack with comfortably padded shoulder straps and a hip belt for life on the trail. It includes a daypack that attaches to the main pack. ($169; 503-985-4000; columbia.com)

First-Aid Kit
Adventure Medical Backcountry Kit This kit has everything from bandages to a scalpel to a top-notch emergency medical book, and there's enough to treat up to 10 people on a 21-day trip. The kit is organ-ized in secure compartments according to injury type. It weighs 2 pounds 9 ounces. Smaller kits are available. ($118; 800-324-3517; adventuremedicalkits.com)

Survival Guns
These two rifles aren't new this year but shouldn't be overlooked.

Kel-Tec SU16 5.56mm Compact (25½ inches long when folded) and lightweight (4.7 pounds), this gun is an easy choice for the backpack. It has a foldaway bipod forestock, which carries two spare 10-round magazines. The stock and trigger mechanism can be folded forward for added safety and to facilitate secure storage. The 5.56mm round is similar to the .223 Rem. and can take down more than just squirrels and rabbits. In addition, it's a more potent personal defense round than, say, a .22. ($640; 321-631-0068; kel-tec.com)

Henry U.S. Survival .22 LR
Super compact (16.5 inches when broken down) and ultralight at only 2.25 pounds, this is the most easily stowed and packed long firearm available. On top of that, it floats. The ammo is light and small, so you can carry a lot of it. The stock holds two extra eight-round magazines. ($205; 718-499-5600; henryrepeating.com)

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from cowboystl1 4/17/2014 at 11:43am

this is a great list if your not gonna be lost to far from your yard salt really? battery power? hello? im not even crazy about the lighter this is more of an advertisement than a serious survival list. this kinda stuff might work in a hunting bag but not for bn lost or in a bad place for a long period of time. i wouldnt have any of this in my bob

i have a rossi youth 410/22 comes in its own bag broke down shells are light and easy

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from Brian Hook 9/2/2013 at 01:58pm

I agree with the coast led flashlight. In order to get a long lasting flashlight with high lumens, you need the led style flashlight. Another good option is the Fenix, Surefire or Streamlight. If you want to see detailed info of these lights www.bestflashlightspot.com

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from Tioughnioga 7/31/2013 at 10:24am

An ordinary sandwich-sized ziplock bag can hold: Two heavy-duty garbage bags; an emergency space blanket; a fold-up disposable poncho; magnesium bar striker; waterproofed matches; two cigarette lighters; two bottle-cap candles; two whistles; two laser-pointers/blinkers; a small water-filter straw; iodine tablets; two or three pocketknives; a couple of razor blades or box cutters; a flat compass and a pin-on ball compass; two condoms for water-carrying; 20 feet or more of coiled-up paracord, that can be used whole or dissected for more cordage; triangular bandage; container of Purell; several Band-Aids; small roll of adhesive tape; and a picture of your loved ones. You've got 3-5 different methods for each of the basics -- shelter, firestarting, water purifying, cutting, and signaling. It all fits in a cargo-pants pocket. I double the ziplocks to make it more waterproof, with the inner bag reversed so the openings are on different ends. If a person can't survive and get found with this stuff, then he or she is probably polluting our gene pool and ought to go anyway.

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from jmgriffo 4/4/2013 at 12:49pm

I have a Skatchet from my dad that he picked up at a gun and boat show 30 years ago. Its a great multipurpose tool made completly from steel. It has a rounded/curved blade, a gut hook, a threaded handle, and can also be used as a hammer or hatchet.

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from Aussie Jim 2/16/2013 at 10:18am

Thanks 4 great posts. B.O.B. Rule of Three different items for same function applies (Defence in Depth).
Equipment Carry.
(1) Worn – in pockets. Compass, mini flashlight pocket knife, whistle, fire starter rod& striker – all on cord lanyard, map, note book, pencil in plastic ‘zip-loc’ bag, lighter, matches, mirror, chem-lite, scarf (water filter) condom (waterbag) & emergency poncho. Pocket survival kit. Zip-loc bag with Cell Phone and thumb drive. Dan Wesson mod 15-2 with 2½” barrel for CCP personal defence. Wear outdoor clothing for season.
(2) ALICE type Belt Rig with GI canteen, S/S Cup, Stove, KFS, water purification tablets, 3 x Ammo Pouch (Ammo, Tools (Mutli tool, Surefire flashlight with scope mount, candle, magnesium block, lighter, heavy duty aluminium foil, firearms tool and cleaning), Dried Food), sheath knife (USAF survival), .357mag revolver (Dan Wesson mod 15-2 with 2½” for CCP personal defence, 4” & 6” barrels) in holster and First Aid Kit. Compact 3x-9x Scope with neck cord in zip-loc bag for hunting, recon & observation in lieu of mini binos.
(3) Day Pack – wet weather jacket, thermal long johns, socks (backup mittens), headlamp, 2 x large garbage bags, bivvy bag, hammock, poncho, para cord, small hatchet, 2 x chem-lites, fishing [collapsible] pole & tackle, food, ammo and First Aid Kit. Nalgene Water bottle with nesting SS cup and small survival manual & First Aid Book in ‘zip-loc’ bag. S/S screw top 8oz drinking flask with neoprene cover for hot drinks in cold weather. S/S Hot food flask. Day Pack can be carried on top of Alice Pack.
(4) ALICE Pack – Sleeping Bag, ground sheet – in rescue signal colour, Surefire flashlight & candle, spare clothes, food, ammo, para cord, First Aid Kit, water filter, Nalgene Water bottle with nesting S/S cup & stove. Machete & Small folding shovel on outside.
Firearms. Agree that AR7 is for fun plinking NOT survival, it was my first rifle.
a. I prefer a Single barrel 12ga shotgun with 19” barrel, clip-on HiViz front sight, Picatinny rail on top of barrel to mount scope and 1” scope rail section at front of underside forearm for flashlight mounting. 25 x Slug for bear etc, 25 x #1 Buckshot (16 pellets) for hunting & self defence & 25 x #4 shot and 20 x 12ga flares. Single-point loop sling for shotgun retention. Also rifled adapters 8” – 12” long in .22 LR, .357mag and .41/.45LC. Can be carried wrapped in top of ALICE pack and or cached.
b. Dan Wesson 15-2 .357mag revolver with 2½” barrel of concealed carry, ie #1 Worn, 4” barrel fitted for dangerous animal protection, ie # 2 ALICE belt rig and 6” barrel for hunting , ie #4 in Back Pack.
c. Ruger Single Six .22LR / .22 mag for snake, rodents and small game. In .22 mag it is a backup personal defence firearm. Carried in # 3 Day Pack. (A great revolver, accurate & effective. I loved mine!)

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from kjohn 2/5/2013 at 09:50pm

A decent compass is must, for sure. A good GPS, used properly, will do things a compass cannot. The "cookie crumb" feature, for example. Key words here are USED PROPERLY. Each new trek can be backtracked by using the GPS to follow the crumb trail back from whence you came, among other things.

I don't need to reminded 10 times about how GPS can fail, etc.. I put that out there as an option.

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from bulldogbob 1/26/2012 at 12:56am

Why is it that with survival gear no one mentions T.P. For over 45 years all I have ever carried is TP & wooden, strike anywhere matches in a zip lock bag. It's all I ever needed in an emergency. If you don't know how to use those 2 items, stay out of the woods. I see so many guys come here to the Rocky Mountains to hunt so loaded down, they are back in camp by 10 am taking a rest. Also no one talks about the number one thing, good transportation.
I always carry my gun, shells, knife, coffee, sandwitch, and TP. Of course I wear clothes for the weather and good boots, but I hate walking out because the battery is dead, a tire flat or get stuck. And FYI, for all you Eastern Boys, the longest wait on a road is an hour before someone drives by on a 4 wheeler during the hunt. And when I hunted in PA, you couldn't use the T.P. without a show. Go lite, go quite, go far. The rest of the gear is in the Jeep.

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from marlin.7mm-08 12/6/2011 at 01:27pm

I carry a High Standard .22 Revolver 9 shot Double action

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from Oshadhi Maha Th... 11/9/2011 at 04:35pm

To be honest the Gerber LMF isn't the ideal survival knife to have with you. The serrations interfere with woodcraft and make it difficult to resharpen in the field. Also there are some instances where the handle has broken/come lose due to battening.

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from albertfrank 9/29/2011 at 09:52am

Everyone has given some great input of the different weapons one should have with them... Albert, http://www.denimjacketsguide.com

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from Nv Hunter 6/19/2011 at 03:20am

Excellent comments from all. The only thing I'd like to comment on is guns of choice. Ive found that my Rossi Youth break action 17hmr with a 3x9 scope is the most accurate and reliable small game rifle I've owned. I know it's a single shot but it teaches ya to slow down and focus. Another great feature is that you can change out the barrels for different rifle calibers and/or shotgun gauges in not much time. And the price is not bad either. Well that's just my two cents. Keep the ideas coming.

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from wgiles 4/16/2011 at 07:06am

I have an AR-7 that my father gave me when I was twelve, in the sixties. I shot it all over and wouldn't part with it for the world, but I wouldn't choose it for my survival gun. I would prefer a short accurate .22 rimfire for small game. I think that a modified Ruger 10-22 might be the best choice. A shorter barrel and a lightweight plastic stock might be the best. It's a semi, but it functions well. I have a Romanian bolt action .22 rimfire training rifle with a Weaver scope that I like for hunting. It shoots well, but has feeding problems and I only have one magazine. That makes it effectively a single shot and I don't like that when dealing with agressive critters, like coons. Raccoons usually show up at night and stir up the cats & dogs. If I have to shoot one, I often need a follow up shot and that is when my bolt action jams. It's dark and I can't see what I'm doing, so I have trouble clearing my rifle. It's for that reason that I've set an old Remington Nylon 66 rifle aside for night time critter invasions. I could mount a flash light to the barrel, but haven't. I can usually see well enough, but not always. There is a real difference between shooting at a squirrel at 25 yards and a mean coon at ten feet, especially when my dogs are keeping it at bay.

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from Tc505 4/10/2011 at 10:18pm

unless you absolutely thing you have to have a semi-auto the best little gun you can get is an over and under. however if a body can get their hands on one of the older .410's. you will see on it that it is rated for .410 OR .45 long colt making it an excellent all purpose gun for survival. it will take down anything you want to shoot at from birds and other small game to bigger game using the colt round. relying on electronics is a no-no because it may come down to having to use common know-how if there is an emp burst which takes out all electronics. any knife you are comfortable with will do but a good folder along with a scabbard knife is a must. firestarters are another along with safety flares which burn quite hot and will start even damp wood. a couple of these thrown into the pack is sufficient. using a pocket stove with hexamine or trioxane fuels or just plain old sticks will suffice as well to cook with. a pocket mirror is a must as well with a good flash light. doesn't matter if it takes batteries since they weigh next to nothing or get one that you shake up.

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from cbarron28 6/22/2009 at 02:24pm

My grandfather carried a savage .22/20 gauge over/under in his bush plane for years. It breaks down nice and small, isn't heavy but can take care of you in a pinch. It'd be nice to have a heavy calibre gun for bear medicine but with good practices, bear encounters are less likely and often diffused without the use of deadly force. Personally, I like to hike with my .444 Marlin if I know I'm in bear country. Otherwise, that .22/20 was handed down to me and makes its way into my pack more often than not.

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from Standingbear 5/14/2009 at 03:11pm

Everyone has given some great input of the different weapons one should have with them. I personlly love either a Lever Action 30/30 or 22 Mag.. If I was to take the 30/30 I then would like the Rugar 22 Mark II Target Pistol with Bull Barrel for small game and such. IF the 22 Mag. , I would like either a 44 Mag, 357 Mag or 9 MM. to use as my heavy hitter. I would even consider a over and under type of Long Gin. 30/30, 223 or 22 Mag. over a 12 Guage. In taking any weapon you will need as much ammo as you can carry bcause again there will not be a hardware store near you and ammo is heavy depending on the caliber. I have almsot made up my mind, but want to still hear more from you all before I make the final decesion. Please keep those ideas coming. If anyone knows of a good site to go to where you can learn more on the weapons to take and survival packing please let me know. My email is standingbear777@gmail.com Thank you all and may GOD watch over and bless you all and your families always!

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from Standingbear 5/14/2009 at 02:39pm

I like everyones input. The packing of a "Kit" is mainly up to the individual. The amount you wish to carry depends once again on the individual. Being in the Army almost Fourteen years before a injury ended my career, I learned you could carry a lot on your back! Many times you had to carry everything you needed to survive until a resupply drop could be made, plus you had to carry extra ammo for the Heavy Weapons. You also had to carry extra batteries for the radio, extra water and you tried to bring a extra Claymore or two and as many grenades as you felt you would need and that was never enough. Each item meant more weight. You did not take a sleeping bag when in a warm area of operations. You took a poncho, poncho liner and netting, a hammock, extra rope. Two good knives. One on your LBE, a pocket knife with mnay extras on it and a good Machette. I carried a file and good wet stone to keep things sharpe and edged. Sometime while hacking you dull the edge on yur Machette and it takes a file to bring in line again. I had the dehydrated food, but also I took a home made trail mix and jerky. You can take a lot and hardly no weight. You took extra socks, underware if you wore any, extra set of fatigues. I could go on with stuff I packed, but the main things is the way you pack it all. If you take the time and pack everything neat and tight you can carry a lot. When packing you may have to take out and repack many times in order to get it the way you want it to be. Make a list of everything and darw a diagram where each item is in your pack. When a long way from the grocery and hardware store, more is better.

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from MOUNTAIN MEDIC 4/5/2009 at 11:50am

i also have some thoughts on guns if you can carry a pistol a ruger convertible is good 22lr or 22 magnum
i think a good multi function rifle /shotgun combo by savage either in .223 over 12ga or 30 30 over 12ga this is a single shot with selector switch rionite (plastic) tuff simple gun
i have the old charter arms ar7 lite semi auto 22 its lite for deer or any sizeable animal a good long barrel 4to8 inch revolver is very good choice like a ruger redhawk 44mag or security six 357 in stainless will do nicely
to call a gun a "survival" gun is misleading anything will do you just have to deal with the weight and cumbersomeness and carry ammunition. I guess ive said a whole lotta nothin then.
If anything i have learned is one gun cant do everything so you have to fine tune your needs or expectations. For some outdoorsman a 22 is all they will ever need if you want to cover all your bases the savage with rifle and shotgun can do that very well. for big game closerange a heavy caliber pistol will do.
just some thoughts

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from MOUNTAIN MEDIC 4/5/2009 at 11:27am

Well this is a great subject many "experts" disagree all the time
I am a paramedic and search and rescue crew boss in the adirondack mtns of new york state i have a few comments on gear
1. new fangled electric items usually never work when you need them there fore a silva ranger is a mainstay if youy dont know how to use a compass you dont belong in the woods as far as knives there are many good strong inexpensive choices some of my favorites are Cold Steel SRK great knife most popular private manufactured knife sold to our troops in irag and afganistan also there recon scout i own the gerbers and the man is right handles dont hold up as far as fire building a couple bics and a flint and steel or magnesium bar and steel work great also 2 to 3 really heavy duty black garbage bags can save your life. one electric device that has become popular is " personal locator beacons" for 4 to 5 hundred bucks hits military satelites and broadcasts your location you might have the national gaurd out but dont initiate unless you are really in trouble . a multitool is of course a great thing and a whistle,iodine tabs,para cord, steel canteen cup,i dont go anywhere without a very small hamock ( nice to be off the ground. Flashlites led is good till real sub zero temps so i carry both also a couple chemlites help maybe some pin flares or a flare shot from the gun you are carrying.
just some ideas.

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from Bo 3/8/2009 at 02:14pm

I don't have a GPS, it's one more thing to have to carry that will not work when you really want it. I use a Silva Ranger compass. It doesn't take up much room and I have used it for years. I don't trust any electronic device in the field. Mr Murphy always shows up for a battery check when you finally become completely dependent on the device. That usually means somebody is screwed. To paraphrase Patrick Henry. 'I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me a compass, (oh and a good topo)!'
For a handgun, depending on the Area of Operation, I carry a Smith 629 Classic hunter, (usually loaded with Hornady 200 gr XTP, maybe something heavier than that if I am expecting pigs) or my 1911 with a Ciener .22LR adapter (10 round magazine) great for squirrel or snakes.
My knife of choice is an Anza I have had for years, 8" total length, durable as the day is long.
I have several packs, rucksacks whatever you want to call them, but I keep going back to an old ALICE frame that works for me. It's been tweaked and it fits. I have humped a lot of hills wearing that thing and there is a bit of nostalgia in it.

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from volcom 2/27/2009 at 08:18pm

i see were yoda is goin. hes right u shouldnt rely on eclectronic equip. i have a lmf2 and its a darn good knife ive hacked,sawed,and hammered but theres one thing i dont like its the handle the material on it tears to easly otherwise darn good knife. but theres a knife from coldsteel that seem almost indestructable its the cold steel kukri its about 29 dollars.

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from outdoors man 2/26/2009 at 04:24pm

I agree with both of you

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from Gavin King 2/22/2009 at 02:48am

I agree with Yoda, good old school knowledge is much more reliable. If you learn how to use landmarks, use the celestial bodies for navigation and learn how to use the kind of navigational tactics the military teaches, like drawing your own map starting from where you are, etc. then you should be fine. You may even be better off learning that stuff than learning how to run a technical piece of equipment. Not saying it cannot be helpful though because every method has it's drawbacks.

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from Gavin King 2/22/2009 at 02:42am

I am honestly surprised that the Henry U.S. Survival rifle is on this list. I owned an earlier model and it was extremely inacurate, and no it wasn't my poor shooting. The case was flimsy and broke very easily. The marketed features were true. It was lightweight, it did float and it fit in a backpack very easily. In my opinion, it isn't worth the money, when you view it in light of how easily broken it is. I prefer my single action, lightweight 20 gauge I have had since I was a boy, in a pinch for survival.

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from Yoda 2/15/2009 at 10:22pm

Never rely soely on the GPS as electronic devives can fail, knowing how to use a compass effectively is cheap and easy to do.

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Write a Comment Your comment (200 characters or less):

from Yoda 2/15/2009 at 10:22pm

Never rely soely on the GPS as electronic devives can fail, knowing how to use a compass effectively is cheap and easy to do.

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from Gavin King 2/22/2009 at 02:42am

I am honestly surprised that the Henry U.S. Survival rifle is on this list. I owned an earlier model and it was extremely inacurate, and no it wasn't my poor shooting. The case was flimsy and broke very easily. The marketed features were true. It was lightweight, it did float and it fit in a backpack very easily. In my opinion, it isn't worth the money, when you view it in light of how easily broken it is. I prefer my single action, lightweight 20 gauge I have had since I was a boy, in a pinch for survival.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from MOUNTAIN MEDIC 4/5/2009 at 11:27am

Well this is a great subject many "experts" disagree all the time
I am a paramedic and search and rescue crew boss in the adirondack mtns of new york state i have a few comments on gear
1. new fangled electric items usually never work when you need them there fore a silva ranger is a mainstay if youy dont know how to use a compass you dont belong in the woods as far as knives there are many good strong inexpensive choices some of my favorites are Cold Steel SRK great knife most popular private manufactured knife sold to our troops in irag and afganistan also there recon scout i own the gerbers and the man is right handles dont hold up as far as fire building a couple bics and a flint and steel or magnesium bar and steel work great also 2 to 3 really heavy duty black garbage bags can save your life. one electric device that has become popular is " personal locator beacons" for 4 to 5 hundred bucks hits military satelites and broadcasts your location you might have the national gaurd out but dont initiate unless you are really in trouble . a multitool is of course a great thing and a whistle,iodine tabs,para cord, steel canteen cup,i dont go anywhere without a very small hamock ( nice to be off the ground. Flashlites led is good till real sub zero temps so i carry both also a couple chemlites help maybe some pin flares or a flare shot from the gun you are carrying.
just some ideas.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tc505 4/10/2011 at 10:18pm

unless you absolutely thing you have to have a semi-auto the best little gun you can get is an over and under. however if a body can get their hands on one of the older .410's. you will see on it that it is rated for .410 OR .45 long colt making it an excellent all purpose gun for survival. it will take down anything you want to shoot at from birds and other small game to bigger game using the colt round. relying on electronics is a no-no because it may come down to having to use common know-how if there is an emp burst which takes out all electronics. any knife you are comfortable with will do but a good folder along with a scabbard knife is a must. firestarters are another along with safety flares which burn quite hot and will start even damp wood. a couple of these thrown into the pack is sufficient. using a pocket stove with hexamine or trioxane fuels or just plain old sticks will suffice as well to cook with. a pocket mirror is a must as well with a good flash light. doesn't matter if it takes batteries since they weigh next to nothing or get one that you shake up.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gavin King 2/22/2009 at 02:48am

I agree with Yoda, good old school knowledge is much more reliable. If you learn how to use landmarks, use the celestial bodies for navigation and learn how to use the kind of navigational tactics the military teaches, like drawing your own map starting from where you are, etc. then you should be fine. You may even be better off learning that stuff than learning how to run a technical piece of equipment. Not saying it cannot be helpful though because every method has it's drawbacks.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bo 3/8/2009 at 02:14pm

I don't have a GPS, it's one more thing to have to carry that will not work when you really want it. I use a Silva Ranger compass. It doesn't take up much room and I have used it for years. I don't trust any electronic device in the field. Mr Murphy always shows up for a battery check when you finally become completely dependent on the device. That usually means somebody is screwed. To paraphrase Patrick Henry. 'I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me a compass, (oh and a good topo)!'
For a handgun, depending on the Area of Operation, I carry a Smith 629 Classic hunter, (usually loaded with Hornady 200 gr XTP, maybe something heavier than that if I am expecting pigs) or my 1911 with a Ciener .22LR adapter (10 round magazine) great for squirrel or snakes.
My knife of choice is an Anza I have had for years, 8" total length, durable as the day is long.
I have several packs, rucksacks whatever you want to call them, but I keep going back to an old ALICE frame that works for me. It's been tweaked and it fits. I have humped a lot of hills wearing that thing and there is a bit of nostalgia in it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from MOUNTAIN MEDIC 4/5/2009 at 11:50am

i also have some thoughts on guns if you can carry a pistol a ruger convertible is good 22lr or 22 magnum
i think a good multi function rifle /shotgun combo by savage either in .223 over 12ga or 30 30 over 12ga this is a single shot with selector switch rionite (plastic) tuff simple gun
i have the old charter arms ar7 lite semi auto 22 its lite for deer or any sizeable animal a good long barrel 4to8 inch revolver is very good choice like a ruger redhawk 44mag or security six 357 in stainless will do nicely
to call a gun a "survival" gun is misleading anything will do you just have to deal with the weight and cumbersomeness and carry ammunition. I guess ive said a whole lotta nothin then.
If anything i have learned is one gun cant do everything so you have to fine tune your needs or expectations. For some outdoorsman a 22 is all they will ever need if you want to cover all your bases the savage with rifle and shotgun can do that very well. for big game closerange a heavy caliber pistol will do.
just some thoughts

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from Standingbear 5/14/2009 at 02:39pm

I like everyones input. The packing of a "Kit" is mainly up to the individual. The amount you wish to carry depends once again on the individual. Being in the Army almost Fourteen years before a injury ended my career, I learned you could carry a lot on your back! Many times you had to carry everything you needed to survive until a resupply drop could be made, plus you had to carry extra ammo for the Heavy Weapons. You also had to carry extra batteries for the radio, extra water and you tried to bring a extra Claymore or two and as many grenades as you felt you would need and that was never enough. Each item meant more weight. You did not take a sleeping bag when in a warm area of operations. You took a poncho, poncho liner and netting, a hammock, extra rope. Two good knives. One on your LBE, a pocket knife with mnay extras on it and a good Machette. I carried a file and good wet stone to keep things sharpe and edged. Sometime while hacking you dull the edge on yur Machette and it takes a file to bring in line again. I had the dehydrated food, but also I took a home made trail mix and jerky. You can take a lot and hardly no weight. You took extra socks, underware if you wore any, extra set of fatigues. I could go on with stuff I packed, but the main things is the way you pack it all. If you take the time and pack everything neat and tight you can carry a lot. When packing you may have to take out and repack many times in order to get it the way you want it to be. Make a list of everything and darw a diagram where each item is in your pack. When a long way from the grocery and hardware store, more is better.

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from Standingbear 5/14/2009 at 03:11pm

Everyone has given some great input of the different weapons one should have with them. I personlly love either a Lever Action 30/30 or 22 Mag.. If I was to take the 30/30 I then would like the Rugar 22 Mark II Target Pistol with Bull Barrel for small game and such. IF the 22 Mag. , I would like either a 44 Mag, 357 Mag or 9 MM. to use as my heavy hitter. I would even consider a over and under type of Long Gin. 30/30, 223 or 22 Mag. over a 12 Guage. In taking any weapon you will need as much ammo as you can carry bcause again there will not be a hardware store near you and ammo is heavy depending on the caliber. I have almsot made up my mind, but want to still hear more from you all before I make the final decesion. Please keep those ideas coming. If anyone knows of a good site to go to where you can learn more on the weapons to take and survival packing please let me know. My email is standingbear777@gmail.com Thank you all and may GOD watch over and bless you all and your families always!

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from albertfrank 9/29/2011 at 09:52am

Everyone has given some great input of the different weapons one should have with them... Albert, http://www.denimjacketsguide.com

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from kjohn 2/5/2013 at 09:50pm

A decent compass is must, for sure. A good GPS, used properly, will do things a compass cannot. The "cookie crumb" feature, for example. Key words here are USED PROPERLY. Each new trek can be backtracked by using the GPS to follow the crumb trail back from whence you came, among other things.

I don't need to reminded 10 times about how GPS can fail, etc.. I put that out there as an option.

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from outdoors man 2/26/2009 at 04:24pm

I agree with both of you

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from volcom 2/27/2009 at 08:18pm

i see were yoda is goin. hes right u shouldnt rely on eclectronic equip. i have a lmf2 and its a darn good knife ive hacked,sawed,and hammered but theres one thing i dont like its the handle the material on it tears to easly otherwise darn good knife. but theres a knife from coldsteel that seem almost indestructable its the cold steel kukri its about 29 dollars.

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from cbarron28 6/22/2009 at 02:24pm

My grandfather carried a savage .22/20 gauge over/under in his bush plane for years. It breaks down nice and small, isn't heavy but can take care of you in a pinch. It'd be nice to have a heavy calibre gun for bear medicine but with good practices, bear encounters are less likely and often diffused without the use of deadly force. Personally, I like to hike with my .444 Marlin if I know I'm in bear country. Otherwise, that .22/20 was handed down to me and makes its way into my pack more often than not.

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from wgiles 4/16/2011 at 07:06am

I have an AR-7 that my father gave me when I was twelve, in the sixties. I shot it all over and wouldn't part with it for the world, but I wouldn't choose it for my survival gun. I would prefer a short accurate .22 rimfire for small game. I think that a modified Ruger 10-22 might be the best choice. A shorter barrel and a lightweight plastic stock might be the best. It's a semi, but it functions well. I have a Romanian bolt action .22 rimfire training rifle with a Weaver scope that I like for hunting. It shoots well, but has feeding problems and I only have one magazine. That makes it effectively a single shot and I don't like that when dealing with agressive critters, like coons. Raccoons usually show up at night and stir up the cats & dogs. If I have to shoot one, I often need a follow up shot and that is when my bolt action jams. It's dark and I can't see what I'm doing, so I have trouble clearing my rifle. It's for that reason that I've set an old Remington Nylon 66 rifle aside for night time critter invasions. I could mount a flash light to the barrel, but haven't. I can usually see well enough, but not always. There is a real difference between shooting at a squirrel at 25 yards and a mean coon at ten feet, especially when my dogs are keeping it at bay.

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from Nv Hunter 6/19/2011 at 03:20am

Excellent comments from all. The only thing I'd like to comment on is guns of choice. Ive found that my Rossi Youth break action 17hmr with a 3x9 scope is the most accurate and reliable small game rifle I've owned. I know it's a single shot but it teaches ya to slow down and focus. Another great feature is that you can change out the barrels for different rifle calibers and/or shotgun gauges in not much time. And the price is not bad either. Well that's just my two cents. Keep the ideas coming.

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from Oshadhi Maha Th... 11/9/2011 at 04:35pm

To be honest the Gerber LMF isn't the ideal survival knife to have with you. The serrations interfere with woodcraft and make it difficult to resharpen in the field. Also there are some instances where the handle has broken/come lose due to battening.

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from marlin.7mm-08 12/6/2011 at 01:27pm

I carry a High Standard .22 Revolver 9 shot Double action

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from bulldogbob 1/26/2012 at 12:56am

Why is it that with survival gear no one mentions T.P. For over 45 years all I have ever carried is TP & wooden, strike anywhere matches in a zip lock bag. It's all I ever needed in an emergency. If you don't know how to use those 2 items, stay out of the woods. I see so many guys come here to the Rocky Mountains to hunt so loaded down, they are back in camp by 10 am taking a rest. Also no one talks about the number one thing, good transportation.
I always carry my gun, shells, knife, coffee, sandwitch, and TP. Of course I wear clothes for the weather and good boots, but I hate walking out because the battery is dead, a tire flat or get stuck. And FYI, for all you Eastern Boys, the longest wait on a road is an hour before someone drives by on a 4 wheeler during the hunt. And when I hunted in PA, you couldn't use the T.P. without a show. Go lite, go quite, go far. The rest of the gear is in the Jeep.

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from Aussie Jim 2/16/2013 at 10:18am

Thanks 4 great posts. B.O.B. Rule of Three different items for same function applies (Defence in Depth).
Equipment Carry.
(1) Worn – in pockets. Compass, mini flashlight pocket knife, whistle, fire starter rod& striker – all on cord lanyard, map, note book, pencil in plastic ‘zip-loc’ bag, lighter, matches, mirror, chem-lite, scarf (water filter) condom (waterbag) & emergency poncho. Pocket survival kit. Zip-loc bag with Cell Phone and thumb drive. Dan Wesson mod 15-2 with 2½” barrel for CCP personal defence. Wear outdoor clothing for season.
(2) ALICE type Belt Rig with GI canteen, S/S Cup, Stove, KFS, water purification tablets, 3 x Ammo Pouch (Ammo, Tools (Mutli tool, Surefire flashlight with scope mount, candle, magnesium block, lighter, heavy duty aluminium foil, firearms tool and cleaning), Dried Food), sheath knife (USAF survival), .357mag revolver (Dan Wesson mod 15-2 with 2½” for CCP personal defence, 4” & 6” barrels) in holster and First Aid Kit. Compact 3x-9x Scope with neck cord in zip-loc bag for hunting, recon & observation in lieu of mini binos.
(3) Day Pack – wet weather jacket, thermal long johns, socks (backup mittens), headlamp, 2 x large garbage bags, bivvy bag, hammock, poncho, para cord, small hatchet, 2 x chem-lites, fishing [collapsible] pole & tackle, food, ammo and First Aid Kit. Nalgene Water bottle with nesting SS cup and small survival manual & First Aid Book in ‘zip-loc’ bag. S/S screw top 8oz drinking flask with neoprene cover for hot drinks in cold weather. S/S Hot food flask. Day Pack can be carried on top of Alice Pack.
(4) ALICE Pack – Sleeping Bag, ground sheet – in rescue signal colour, Surefire flashlight & candle, spare clothes, food, ammo, para cord, First Aid Kit, water filter, Nalgene Water bottle with nesting S/S cup & stove. Machete & Small folding shovel on outside.
Firearms. Agree that AR7 is for fun plinking NOT survival, it was my first rifle.
a. I prefer a Single barrel 12ga shotgun with 19” barrel, clip-on HiViz front sight, Picatinny rail on top of barrel to mount scope and 1” scope rail section at front of underside forearm for flashlight mounting. 25 x Slug for bear etc, 25 x #1 Buckshot (16 pellets) for hunting & self defence & 25 x #4 shot and 20 x 12ga flares. Single-point loop sling for shotgun retention. Also rifled adapters 8” – 12” long in .22 LR, .357mag and .41/.45LC. Can be carried wrapped in top of ALICE pack and or cached.
b. Dan Wesson 15-2 .357mag revolver with 2½” barrel of concealed carry, ie #1 Worn, 4” barrel fitted for dangerous animal protection, ie # 2 ALICE belt rig and 6” barrel for hunting , ie #4 in Back Pack.
c. Ruger Single Six .22LR / .22 mag for snake, rodents and small game. In .22 mag it is a backup personal defence firearm. Carried in # 3 Day Pack. (A great revolver, accurate & effective. I loved mine!)

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from jmgriffo 4/4/2013 at 12:49pm

I have a Skatchet from my dad that he picked up at a gun and boat show 30 years ago. Its a great multipurpose tool made completly from steel. It has a rounded/curved blade, a gut hook, a threaded handle, and can also be used as a hammer or hatchet.

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from Tioughnioga 7/31/2013 at 10:24am

An ordinary sandwich-sized ziplock bag can hold: Two heavy-duty garbage bags; an emergency space blanket; a fold-up disposable poncho; magnesium bar striker; waterproofed matches; two cigarette lighters; two bottle-cap candles; two whistles; two laser-pointers/blinkers; a small water-filter straw; iodine tablets; two or three pocketknives; a couple of razor blades or box cutters; a flat compass and a pin-on ball compass; two condoms for water-carrying; 20 feet or more of coiled-up paracord, that can be used whole or dissected for more cordage; triangular bandage; container of Purell; several Band-Aids; small roll of adhesive tape; and a picture of your loved ones. You've got 3-5 different methods for each of the basics -- shelter, firestarting, water purifying, cutting, and signaling. It all fits in a cargo-pants pocket. I double the ziplocks to make it more waterproof, with the inner bag reversed so the openings are on different ends. If a person can't survive and get found with this stuff, then he or she is probably polluting our gene pool and ought to go anyway.

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from Brian Hook 9/2/2013 at 01:58pm

I agree with the coast led flashlight. In order to get a long lasting flashlight with high lumens, you need the led style flashlight. Another good option is the Fenix, Surefire or Streamlight. If you want to see detailed info of these lights www.bestflashlightspot.com

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from cowboystl1 4/17/2014 at 11:43am

this is a great list if your not gonna be lost to far from your yard salt really? battery power? hello? im not even crazy about the lighter this is more of an advertisement than a serious survival list. this kinda stuff might work in a hunting bag but not for bn lost or in a bad place for a long period of time. i wouldnt have any of this in my bob

i have a rossi youth 410/22 comes in its own bag broke down shells are light and easy

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