Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

The Bug Out Bag

What if you had only three minutes to grab whatever you could take from your home, and the rest of your belongings would be lost forever?

What would you take? 

As the compound disaster in Japan switches from the short term devastation of the earthquakes and tsunami to the long term and complicated damage of nuclear radiation, many people that have been forced from their homes are facing the fact that they may not be able to return for a long time, if ever.

With this in mind, let’s discuss the value of a Bug Out Bag. This bag (B.O.B. for short) is a collection of goods that you would need to survive if you had to flee your home with no guarantee of shelter, food or water during the emergency. Think of the B.O.B. as your survival insurance policy for any disaster or mayhem. 

Most people use either a backpack or a duffle bag as the container for their goods, which should include basic survival essentials and a few irreplaceable items. Any good B.O.B. should include a minimum of the following—with most things sealed in zip-top bags to prevent water damage:

•    Necessary prescription meds that you need to live
•    Shelter items like a backpacking tent and sleeping bag, or at least a tarp and blanket
•    A couple quarts of drinking water, and purification equipment to disinfect more water
•    High-calorie, no-cook foods like protein bars, peanut butter, trail mix, etc.
•    First-aid, sanitation and hygiene supplies
•    Fire starting methods, and a small pot to boil water or cook
•    A few basic tools like a knife, some duct tape, rope, etc.
•    Extra clothes appropriate to the season
•    Flashlight with extra batteries
•    Cash
•    A digital backup of all your important documents and family treasures. This could be a thumb drive with your bank info, insurance documents, wills, family photos and videos

You could keep a B.O.B. by the front door, or even have multiple bags at home, at the office and in your car. This might seem like overkill, or even a little paranoid to some of you, but just imagine what a difference this kind of preparation would have made to the people of Japan. Then think of the difference a B.O.B. will make if those disasters happen to you.

Comments (21)

» Write a Comment
Top Rated
All Comments
from stoneageliving 3/22/2014 at 12:19pm

the more you know the less you carry, nature is your survival kit and your brain is your #1 survival tool

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Romanempire86 3/10/2014 at 04:45pm

I bought a BOB from the guys at Readytogosurvival.com. They beat Amazon's prices, built me a custom BOB, have first responder backgrounds, and gave awesome customer service.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from camping-foods.net 11/8/2013 at 03:01pm

There is some excellent advice in this thread. But, My personal take on the question "what would you grab if you only had 3 minutes" is this. Most ordinary people do not have a go bag, bug out bag, God bag or survival pack or whatever you want to call it, so with that being said in 3 minutes, which is not very long, the typical person should grab the most important things to keep them ALIVE.

1) Water purification - ie: bleach, purification tablets or a filter
2) Dry food goods - ie: oatmeal,crackers etc.
3) Shelter - ie: tent, tarps, sleeping bags etc.

In a perfect world and with extra time you would need some type of pot for boiling, cooking etc, a knife and some form of fire starter and extra clothes.

Now in a situation where there is a real need for bug out, meaning you are NOT coming back, you better make all those seconds and minutes count and you better be able to carry at least 40% of your body weight in supply and gear. More often than not, transportation will be out of the question so it will be all on your back.

There are many scenarios that could come into play but on a serious note, everyone should have an emergency bag of some sort with the basic necessities.

For a long term bug out, you had better have a plan, some where to go, and then realize you will need to be as far away from the mayhem that is happening as possible. Realize too, that food will be an issue after so many days and I'm going to step out on a limb here and say hunting will not suffice for most ordinary people either.

It is not as easy as one imagines and can be a serious mental deflater. Preparedness for long term is just that, prepared for the worst. You better have alternative methods, hunting, fishing, seeds, gardening, and even aquaponic type of growing skills.

Water can be had, may not be easy at times but it can be had, food is a hugely under rated necessity and the mistaken will pay dearly with starvation.

That's just my personal take. Thanks for all the great advice and information in here. There are some good thinkers out there.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tufforcop 10/17/2013 at 07:21am

I typically have two levels of bug-out kit, a short term and long term (Ie likely not coming back...) both have the basic survival food and medical supplies. the long term kit has the addition of vacuum sealed seeds. something for folks to think on...

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from First Aid Expert 11/5/2012 at 08:49pm

Everything you need in a bug out bag and a lot more is at www.first-aid-product.com/pgSurvival.htm Plus good survival tips...
They've got it all broken down into easy categories including:

Water Rations + Siphon Pump, Water in pouches to various Gallon Drums, Water Preserver, Minute Meals & Aqua Boxes.

Food Rations
1200-3600 Calorie Survival Bars

Lighting & Heating
Various types of Flashlights & Glow Sticks, Batteries, Hand Warmers, Slow Burn Candles & Portable Generators.

Shelter & Sleeping
Ponchos, 2-6+ Person Tents, Canopys, Cots, Vinyl Tarps, Sleeping Bags, Solar / Wool Blankets, Air Mattress & Air Pumps.

1, 2, 3 & 4 Person Kits
Basic & Personal Survival Kits & American Red Cross Kits. Commuter Kits available in Economy, Deluxe & Buckets.
5, 10 & 20 Person Kits
Basic & Personal Survival Kits & American Red Cross Kits. Commuter Kits available in Economy, Deluxe & Buckets.

C.E.R.T. Products and Gear
C.E.R.T. Starter Set, Action Response Unit & C.E.R.T. Deluxe Action Unit, Clipboards, Fieldbook, Helmets & Ponchos.

American Red Cross Kits
Different American Red Cross 'Be Red Cross Ready' Personal Emergency Preparedness Kits and SmartPack with BackPack Kit.

Auto Survival Kits
Economy Road Warrior Kit, Various General Auto Kits, Urban Warrior Kit, Mountain Road Warrior Kit & High Visibility Incident Unit.

Tools
70+ Items including Duct Tape, Work Gloves, Bungee Cord, Utility Knife, Goggles, Tools, Rope, Kneepads & Fire Alarms.

Communication Solutions
30+ items including LED Flashlights / FM Radios, Walkie Talkies, Cell Phone Charger, MegaPhones & Stop Signs.

Evacuation & Fire Supplies
Barricade “Caution” Tape, Fire Extinguishers, Fire Ladders, Fire Masks, Kidde Digital Carbon & Fire Alarms.

Outdoor & Camp Supplies
Wilderness Gear, Survival Supplies, Outdoor and Camping - including Sunscreen in Pouch / Towelette, Insect Repellent in spray bottle / towelette & Redi-Wash Self Heating Washcloths.

Pet Emergency Supplies
Illuminated Dog Collars & Leashes, Pet Safety Vests, Coleman Dog Tent & Pet Carriers. MediBags & First Aid DVDs for pets.

Triage Supplies
Triage Tags, Tarps & Clipboard, Incident Command & Triage on Wheels, Triage Tape: Minor, Morgue, Delayed, Immediate.

Trauma & First Responder
Trauma Responder Pack & Deluxe Pack. Responder Kit, START II Trauma Kit & 50-1,000+ Person FirstAid Trauma Medi Kits.

Trauma & First Responder Kits
Search & Rescue Equipment
Safety Vests, Clipboard, Body Bags & Neon Hats. Multi-Person Deluxe / Professional Rescue Kits and Backpacks.

Search & Rescue Equipment
Sanitary Supplies
Various different Personal Hygiene Kits, Sanitizers, Port-A-Potty Chemicals, Tissue, Toilet Paper & Solar Shower Units.

First Aid Survival Kits
Basic First Aid & Survival Kits, Outdoor Kits, Fanny Pack Kits, Travelers Aid, Roll & Go Survival & Classroom Lockdown Kits.

Empty Storage Bags
Waterproof Utility Pouch, Roll Up Sleeve, Backpacks, Fanny Packs, Sports Bags, Yellow Carry Case, Duffel on Wheels.

Water Bottles & Containers
Water in pouches to various Gallon Drums, Water Preserver

Electrolyte Tablets
Electrolyte Tablets minimize fatigue, prevent muscle cramps and heat prostration

Even
Radiation Protection: Thyroid Blocking Potassium Iodide Potassium Iodide Tablets: Thyroid Blockers for Radiation Protection

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Wilderness Surv... 9/27/2012 at 10:38am

Bring Toilet Paper unless you like the feel of leaves. Wipes also work well.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from PappyCanoli 5/24/2012 at 05:22pm

One comment i would make is carry ability. Can you tote your BOB as far as you need to go. My solution, a tactical carry vest, Load Bearing suspenders with pelt for accessories, shoulder bag, hydration pack and back back. Each bag equals to the weight of 1 large BOB and it can be shared easier with others in your party. Also, my vest and shoulder bag become my EDC bag. (Every Day Carry), i use my EDC as a means of getting home from work or play so i can get to my family and BOB and food storage. Just my thoughts.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Eartheasy LifeStraw 2/3/2012 at 12:14pm

I made kits for my friends this last Christmas, and this is what I included:

Space Blanket
Rain Poncho
Shake Hand Warmers
Twine - 20’
Fire starter sticks
Lighter
Tinfoil
Knife
Flashlight/glowstick/flashing beacon/whistle combo
Whistle/Compass/Magnification glass combo
Tape – for sprains, closing wounds (Wrapped around poncho).
Ibuprofen 200 mg each. Take two or three at once.
Band aids – 2, waterproof.
LifeStraw http://eartheasy.com/lifestraw

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from bulldogbob 1/26/2012 at 06:06pm

For your consideration: Keep empty containers ready. I have 2 smaller vs 1 large to be able to pack food and bathroom items. A box of Heavy Duty Trash Bags in the closets for clothing and bedding. Keeping in mind what you use everyday is what you will want. In my autos, I keep my BOB so I have it where ever I am.
There is always a recharable flashlight plugged in and ready.
Of course I have the back up 24 foot travel trailer, 2 Jeeps, generator, boat with gas/elect motors, bikes, and all the rest. Extra stash of money in small bills and change is good.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from holly57 1/18/2012 at 08:32am

Your go bag should provide essentials for any situation. Shelter, Fire, Water, Defense, and a means to gain food. Every person has different skill levels and what gear/resources you require to provide these essentials are different from someone else. And remember your go bag should take into mind both urban and wilderness areasTerrassenfliesen verfugen Fliesen versiegeln Granitfliesen imprägnieren

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from timo5150 11/5/2011 at 10:45pm

I would grab my bug out bag from http://www.rockymountainsurvival my meds, my back pack that is already set up and a bucket of food. Think I could be ready in 3 mins

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from AMM0 9/18/2011 at 06:19pm

How much and how deep has the you-know-what actually hit the fans? If we're talking about total economic collapse, your hard-earned cash won't be worth spit. You'll need true commodities and true items worth bartering for. I don't care how much cash you have. It's not going to do myself or my family any good if we're at the point we're bugging out.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gavin King 9/5/2011 at 11:19am

I believe in WILDERNESS survival and have a luxurious survival pack which contains redundant means that would allow me to survive indefinitely. It weighs about a pound and a half and includes three forms of rain proof shelter, at least three ways to start a fire, catch food and lashing. Also in there is everything I would need to purify water, signal and a multi tool. Granted, if you live in town, this probably won't do, but I don't plan on being stuck in town when the SHTF. :)

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from suzettech 8/20/2011 at 04:00am

That's cool. Thanks Tim, I enjoyed.
http://ideal-escapes.com/

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from wingslevel 5/8/2011 at 08:07pm

i keep three basic tiers of "bags" plus the stuff on me everyday.
everyday i have my ccw(J or L frame .357) and ammo, buck vantage pro, small light, victorinox hunter, phone and pocket Bible. that is what i'll "use" to get to my car.

in my car or office i have a bag w/spare ammo, multitool, small fixed blade, thumb drive of docs, spare cash and shelter/fire/light/1staid/h2o/signal/food kit along with typical car tool kit. pretty minimal and just enough to keep me and my family "going" for a couple days with the goal to get us home/safety after a breakdown or emergency. that always stays in car or one in office.

in house have a beefier version with all the same things in car/offc but additional amounts and some extra clothing, additional food/fire/h2o/light/shelter/signal types, para/duct and paper copies of docs. it's all kept in the room we use for weather emergencies so that it is with us and if we loose part of the house we still have some basics in the room we are to get by no matter what else we loose. if we leave due to emergency or evac it goes with us to supplement the car kit. on trips it goes in as well. it also will hold another ccw larger then typically carry on me.

next bag is drag bag. its for oh man we know we're not coming back for a while and adds more of the same plus campstove, drip filter, thorough medical kit, lots of bttys, more ammo of hunting large/small game. it's only used if we have time to pack up and go (ie weather evac)

i've consolidated all electronics to AA btty and all ccw to .357 so with each bag having .38/.357 i have spare for whatever i carried that day.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from cherokee matt 5/5/2011 at 08:12pm

Another thing that I think is important to mention is that although it would be extremely wise to have cash on you, remember that twenty dollar bills aren't the best form...I would advise using all 1's or even 5's. If you think about it, if U.S. currency is still even valued as a means of trade in a situation that would require you to need a bugout bag...remember that the people you might be trading with aren't always going to have change...and speaking of that, coins have been around long before paper currency, and can be used for smaller things. Just don't surpass this minor detail when preparing for you "go bag"

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from cherokee matt 5/2/2011 at 10:54pm

Well I actually have what I affectionately call my "go back" which is always ready to go. Your go bag should provide essentials for any situation. Shelter, Fire, Water, Defense, and a means to gain food. Every person has different skill levels and what gear/resources you require to provide these essentials are different from someone else. And remember your go bag should take into mind both urban and wilderness areas, you aren't always going to know where your next stopping point is going to be so you must take everything into consideration. My "Go bag" contains poncho and para cord for shelter, small cantene + big water bottle (can never have enough water, a small german pocket stove, a small filleting knife and emergency fishing gear (line, hooks, sinkers), a folding serrated blade, some spare changeable razor blades, flint striker, waterproofed strike anywhere matches, flint striker, dryer lint, and a small first aid kit.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bass bomber 4/11/2011 at 06:10pm

Well if we're talking about survival supplies in like my bedroom I would just grab my knives, flint, knife sharpener, headlamp & flashlight, extra clothes, duck tape & rope, bow, and my water canteen i guess. But I dont have all that in a bag, I could use the OL bag I got with my subscribtion.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bugger-me 4/6/2011 at 09:29pm

I like to call them GOD Bags!

Get Out of Dodge!

To each his own when it comes to GOD Bags. I like mine stocked with a Glock 10mm with enough ammo for a week and shooting glasses.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JohnT 3/26/2011 at 06:54pm

All good points, wgiles. Thanks for weighing in. It's definitely important to stay up on expirations dates. And if your budget will allow it, keep as many different B.O.B.s as you can afford for various situations in various places.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from wgiles 3/25/2011 at 05:35pm

This is all well and good and I don't disagree, but many of the items mentioned need to be rotated out and replaced with fresh ones. Tis is particularly true with medications I have several bag that I keep for traveling and each has some prescription and OTC medications in it. I try to replenish these and use up the old stock periodically. Even so, there are some medications that I don't use regularly and could be several years old. Some are blister packed and should stay good for a while and some are bulk packed. It might be best to plan for several different events and seasons. Winter gear will be different from summer gear. My biggest concern here is storms and wind damage. Often the best thing to do is stay put and ride it out. Traveling is a different scenario. I try to keep enough gear in the trucks to allow me to survive a few days away from home.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report

Write a Comment Your comment (200 characters or less):

from wgiles 3/25/2011 at 05:35pm

This is all well and good and I don't disagree, but many of the items mentioned need to be rotated out and replaced with fresh ones. Tis is particularly true with medications I have several bag that I keep for traveling and each has some prescription and OTC medications in it. I try to replenish these and use up the old stock periodically. Even so, there are some medications that I don't use regularly and could be several years old. Some are blister packed and should stay good for a while and some are bulk packed. It might be best to plan for several different events and seasons. Winter gear will be different from summer gear. My biggest concern here is storms and wind damage. Often the best thing to do is stay put and ride it out. Traveling is a different scenario. I try to keep enough gear in the trucks to allow me to survive a few days away from home.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from JohnT 3/26/2011 at 06:54pm

All good points, wgiles. Thanks for weighing in. It's definitely important to stay up on expirations dates. And if your budget will allow it, keep as many different B.O.B.s as you can afford for various situations in various places.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from AMM0 9/18/2011 at 06:19pm

How much and how deep has the you-know-what actually hit the fans? If we're talking about total economic collapse, your hard-earned cash won't be worth spit. You'll need true commodities and true items worth bartering for. I don't care how much cash you have. It's not going to do myself or my family any good if we're at the point we're bugging out.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from cherokee matt 5/5/2011 at 08:12pm

Another thing that I think is important to mention is that although it would be extremely wise to have cash on you, remember that twenty dollar bills aren't the best form...I would advise using all 1's or even 5's. If you think about it, if U.S. currency is still even valued as a means of trade in a situation that would require you to need a bugout bag...remember that the people you might be trading with aren't always going to have change...and speaking of that, coins have been around long before paper currency, and can be used for smaller things. Just don't surpass this minor detail when preparing for you "go bag"

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from wingslevel 5/8/2011 at 08:07pm

i keep three basic tiers of "bags" plus the stuff on me everyday.
everyday i have my ccw(J or L frame .357) and ammo, buck vantage pro, small light, victorinox hunter, phone and pocket Bible. that is what i'll "use" to get to my car.

in my car or office i have a bag w/spare ammo, multitool, small fixed blade, thumb drive of docs, spare cash and shelter/fire/light/1staid/h2o/signal/food kit along with typical car tool kit. pretty minimal and just enough to keep me and my family "going" for a couple days with the goal to get us home/safety after a breakdown or emergency. that always stays in car or one in office.

in house have a beefier version with all the same things in car/offc but additional amounts and some extra clothing, additional food/fire/h2o/light/shelter/signal types, para/duct and paper copies of docs. it's all kept in the room we use for weather emergencies so that it is with us and if we loose part of the house we still have some basics in the room we are to get by no matter what else we loose. if we leave due to emergency or evac it goes with us to supplement the car kit. on trips it goes in as well. it also will hold another ccw larger then typically carry on me.

next bag is drag bag. its for oh man we know we're not coming back for a while and adds more of the same plus campstove, drip filter, thorough medical kit, lots of bttys, more ammo of hunting large/small game. it's only used if we have time to pack up and go (ie weather evac)

i've consolidated all electronics to AA btty and all ccw to .357 so with each bag having .38/.357 i have spare for whatever i carried that day.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from bulldogbob 1/26/2012 at 06:06pm

For your consideration: Keep empty containers ready. I have 2 smaller vs 1 large to be able to pack food and bathroom items. A box of Heavy Duty Trash Bags in the closets for clothing and bedding. Keeping in mind what you use everyday is what you will want. In my autos, I keep my BOB so I have it where ever I am.
There is always a recharable flashlight plugged in and ready.
Of course I have the back up 24 foot travel trailer, 2 Jeeps, generator, boat with gas/elect motors, bikes, and all the rest. Extra stash of money in small bills and change is good.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Eartheasy LifeStraw 2/3/2012 at 12:14pm

I made kits for my friends this last Christmas, and this is what I included:

Space Blanket
Rain Poncho
Shake Hand Warmers
Twine - 20’
Fire starter sticks
Lighter
Tinfoil
Knife
Flashlight/glowstick/flashing beacon/whistle combo
Whistle/Compass/Magnification glass combo
Tape – for sprains, closing wounds (Wrapped around poncho).
Ibuprofen 200 mg each. Take two or three at once.
Band aids – 2, waterproof.
LifeStraw http://eartheasy.com/lifestraw

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from First Aid Expert 11/5/2012 at 08:49pm

Everything you need in a bug out bag and a lot more is at www.first-aid-product.com/pgSurvival.htm Plus good survival tips...
They've got it all broken down into easy categories including:

Water Rations + Siphon Pump, Water in pouches to various Gallon Drums, Water Preserver, Minute Meals & Aqua Boxes.

Food Rations
1200-3600 Calorie Survival Bars

Lighting & Heating
Various types of Flashlights & Glow Sticks, Batteries, Hand Warmers, Slow Burn Candles & Portable Generators.

Shelter & Sleeping
Ponchos, 2-6+ Person Tents, Canopys, Cots, Vinyl Tarps, Sleeping Bags, Solar / Wool Blankets, Air Mattress & Air Pumps.

1, 2, 3 & 4 Person Kits
Basic & Personal Survival Kits & American Red Cross Kits. Commuter Kits available in Economy, Deluxe & Buckets.
5, 10 & 20 Person Kits
Basic & Personal Survival Kits & American Red Cross Kits. Commuter Kits available in Economy, Deluxe & Buckets.

C.E.R.T. Products and Gear
C.E.R.T. Starter Set, Action Response Unit & C.E.R.T. Deluxe Action Unit, Clipboards, Fieldbook, Helmets & Ponchos.

American Red Cross Kits
Different American Red Cross 'Be Red Cross Ready' Personal Emergency Preparedness Kits and SmartPack with BackPack Kit.

Auto Survival Kits
Economy Road Warrior Kit, Various General Auto Kits, Urban Warrior Kit, Mountain Road Warrior Kit & High Visibility Incident Unit.

Tools
70+ Items including Duct Tape, Work Gloves, Bungee Cord, Utility Knife, Goggles, Tools, Rope, Kneepads & Fire Alarms.

Communication Solutions
30+ items including LED Flashlights / FM Radios, Walkie Talkies, Cell Phone Charger, MegaPhones & Stop Signs.

Evacuation & Fire Supplies
Barricade “Caution” Tape, Fire Extinguishers, Fire Ladders, Fire Masks, Kidde Digital Carbon & Fire Alarms.

Outdoor & Camp Supplies
Wilderness Gear, Survival Supplies, Outdoor and Camping - including Sunscreen in Pouch / Towelette, Insect Repellent in spray bottle / towelette & Redi-Wash Self Heating Washcloths.

Pet Emergency Supplies
Illuminated Dog Collars & Leashes, Pet Safety Vests, Coleman Dog Tent & Pet Carriers. MediBags & First Aid DVDs for pets.

Triage Supplies
Triage Tags, Tarps & Clipboard, Incident Command & Triage on Wheels, Triage Tape: Minor, Morgue, Delayed, Immediate.

Trauma & First Responder
Trauma Responder Pack & Deluxe Pack. Responder Kit, START II Trauma Kit & 50-1,000+ Person FirstAid Trauma Medi Kits.

Trauma & First Responder Kits
Search & Rescue Equipment
Safety Vests, Clipboard, Body Bags & Neon Hats. Multi-Person Deluxe / Professional Rescue Kits and Backpacks.

Search & Rescue Equipment
Sanitary Supplies
Various different Personal Hygiene Kits, Sanitizers, Port-A-Potty Chemicals, Tissue, Toilet Paper & Solar Shower Units.

First Aid Survival Kits
Basic First Aid & Survival Kits, Outdoor Kits, Fanny Pack Kits, Travelers Aid, Roll & Go Survival & Classroom Lockdown Kits.

Empty Storage Bags
Waterproof Utility Pouch, Roll Up Sleeve, Backpacks, Fanny Packs, Sports Bags, Yellow Carry Case, Duffel on Wheels.

Water Bottles & Containers
Water in pouches to various Gallon Drums, Water Preserver

Electrolyte Tablets
Electrolyte Tablets minimize fatigue, prevent muscle cramps and heat prostration

Even
Radiation Protection: Thyroid Blocking Potassium Iodide Potassium Iodide Tablets: Thyroid Blockers for Radiation Protection

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bugger-me 4/6/2011 at 09:29pm

I like to call them GOD Bags!

Get Out of Dodge!

To each his own when it comes to GOD Bags. I like mine stocked with a Glock 10mm with enough ammo for a week and shooting glasses.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bass bomber 4/11/2011 at 06:10pm

Well if we're talking about survival supplies in like my bedroom I would just grab my knives, flint, knife sharpener, headlamp & flashlight, extra clothes, duck tape & rope, bow, and my water canteen i guess. But I dont have all that in a bag, I could use the OL bag I got with my subscribtion.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from cherokee matt 5/2/2011 at 10:54pm

Well I actually have what I affectionately call my "go back" which is always ready to go. Your go bag should provide essentials for any situation. Shelter, Fire, Water, Defense, and a means to gain food. Every person has different skill levels and what gear/resources you require to provide these essentials are different from someone else. And remember your go bag should take into mind both urban and wilderness areas, you aren't always going to know where your next stopping point is going to be so you must take everything into consideration. My "Go bag" contains poncho and para cord for shelter, small cantene + big water bottle (can never have enough water, a small german pocket stove, a small filleting knife and emergency fishing gear (line, hooks, sinkers), a folding serrated blade, some spare changeable razor blades, flint striker, waterproofed strike anywhere matches, flint striker, dryer lint, and a small first aid kit.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from holly57 1/18/2012 at 08:32am

Your go bag should provide essentials for any situation. Shelter, Fire, Water, Defense, and a means to gain food. Every person has different skill levels and what gear/resources you require to provide these essentials are different from someone else. And remember your go bag should take into mind both urban and wilderness areasTerrassenfliesen verfugen Fliesen versiegeln Granitfliesen imprägnieren

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Wilderness Surv... 9/27/2012 at 10:38am

Bring Toilet Paper unless you like the feel of leaves. Wipes also work well.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tufforcop 10/17/2013 at 07:21am

I typically have two levels of bug-out kit, a short term and long term (Ie likely not coming back...) both have the basic survival food and medical supplies. the long term kit has the addition of vacuum sealed seeds. something for folks to think on...

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Romanempire86 3/10/2014 at 04:45pm

I bought a BOB from the guys at Readytogosurvival.com. They beat Amazon's prices, built me a custom BOB, have first responder backgrounds, and gave awesome customer service.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from stoneageliving 3/22/2014 at 12:19pm

the more you know the less you carry, nature is your survival kit and your brain is your #1 survival tool

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from suzettech 8/20/2011 at 04:00am

That's cool. Thanks Tim, I enjoyed.
http://ideal-escapes.com/

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from timo5150 11/5/2011 at 10:45pm

I would grab my bug out bag from http://www.rockymountainsurvival my meds, my back pack that is already set up and a bucket of food. Think I could be ready in 3 mins

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from PappyCanoli 5/24/2012 at 05:22pm

One comment i would make is carry ability. Can you tote your BOB as far as you need to go. My solution, a tactical carry vest, Load Bearing suspenders with pelt for accessories, shoulder bag, hydration pack and back back. Each bag equals to the weight of 1 large BOB and it can be shared easier with others in your party. Also, my vest and shoulder bag become my EDC bag. (Every Day Carry), i use my EDC as a means of getting home from work or play so i can get to my family and BOB and food storage. Just my thoughts.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from camping-foods.net 11/8/2013 at 03:01pm

There is some excellent advice in this thread. But, My personal take on the question "what would you grab if you only had 3 minutes" is this. Most ordinary people do not have a go bag, bug out bag, God bag or survival pack or whatever you want to call it, so with that being said in 3 minutes, which is not very long, the typical person should grab the most important things to keep them ALIVE.

1) Water purification - ie: bleach, purification tablets or a filter
2) Dry food goods - ie: oatmeal,crackers etc.
3) Shelter - ie: tent, tarps, sleeping bags etc.

In a perfect world and with extra time you would need some type of pot for boiling, cooking etc, a knife and some form of fire starter and extra clothes.

Now in a situation where there is a real need for bug out, meaning you are NOT coming back, you better make all those seconds and minutes count and you better be able to carry at least 40% of your body weight in supply and gear. More often than not, transportation will be out of the question so it will be all on your back.

There are many scenarios that could come into play but on a serious note, everyone should have an emergency bag of some sort with the basic necessities.

For a long term bug out, you had better have a plan, some where to go, and then realize you will need to be as far away from the mayhem that is happening as possible. Realize too, that food will be an issue after so many days and I'm going to step out on a limb here and say hunting will not suffice for most ordinary people either.

It is not as easy as one imagines and can be a serious mental deflater. Preparedness for long term is just that, prepared for the worst. You better have alternative methods, hunting, fishing, seeds, gardening, and even aquaponic type of growing skills.

Water can be had, may not be easy at times but it can be had, food is a hugely under rated necessity and the mistaken will pay dearly with starvation.

That's just my personal take. Thanks for all the great advice and information in here. There are some good thinkers out there.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gavin King 9/5/2011 at 11:19am

I believe in WILDERNESS survival and have a luxurious survival pack which contains redundant means that would allow me to survive indefinitely. It weighs about a pound and a half and includes three forms of rain proof shelter, at least three ways to start a fire, catch food and lashing. Also in there is everything I would need to purify water, signal and a multi tool. Granted, if you live in town, this probably won't do, but I don't plan on being stuck in town when the SHTF. :)

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

Write a Comment Your comment (200 characters or less):

bmxbiz