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  • August 30, 2012

    Survival Skills: How to Make a Squirrel Snare Trap-2

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    This snare set up is a classic. It’s just a wooden pole and a few feet of wire that gives you a reusable trap that is easily moved, requires no bait, and takes advantage of the squirrel’s natural love of short cuts.

    Here’s how to make it.

    Select a 4-foot to 6-foot pole that is about the diameter of your arm. It’s best if the pole has a rough, natural look to it, so don’t carve off all the bark. It’s also helpful if the pole has a fork at one end, which you can stick into the ground or pin against the tree to keep the pole from twisting out of place.

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  • August 28, 2012

    Ultimate Survival Manual: Hurricane Safety Tips-0

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    As Hurricane Isaac bears down on New Orleans, Gulf Coast residents are hunkering down and bracing for impact. The storm is expected to hit within miles of where Katrina made landfall seven years ago on Tuesday night, and experts say Isaac could drop up to 20 inches of rain throughout the region.

    While Isaac is a Category 1 hurricane (Katrina was a Category 3), preparedness and cautiousness are still critical. If you're going to be caught in the storm, prepare yourself by reading through the hurricane survival tips listed below from The Outdoor Life Ultimate Survival Manual.

    Hurricane Safety: How to Survive a Massive Hurricane

    Hurricane Safety: Prepare a Checklist for Your Home

    Hurricane Safety: How to Reinforce Garage Doors

    Hurricane Safety: How to Rescue Someone in a Flood

    Hurricane Safety: How to Build a Sandbag Dike

    [ Read Full Post ]

  • August 28, 2012

    Hurricane Safety Tip: How to Rescue Someone Caught in a Flood-2

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    The fast current of a flash flood is one of its biggest dangers. But if someone  is trapped by a flash flood— clinging to a tree branch  or perched on the roof of a car—try using that speed to your advantage.

    Step One
    Tie a rescue rope to a solid object (a tree, for example) to anchor it against the weight of the victim and the flowing water’s immense pressure.

    [ Read Full Post ]
  • August 28, 2012

    Hurricane Safety Tip: How to Survive a Massive Hurricane-0

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    With Hurricane Katrina bearing down on his Gautier, Mississippi, home, Armand Charest decided to ignore the weather experts advising evacuation. Instead, he and his wife prepared to ride out the storm—much as they had ridden out previous hurricanes.

    As the warnings grew more urgent, the Charests decided to take shelter with neighbors whose house was at a higher elevation. They brought along  emergency food and water supplies to add to the essentials already at the home, such as a generator and extra gas in jerry cans. Once the power went out, they used a battery-powered TV to keep track of the storm’s progress.

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  • August 28, 2012

    Hurricane Safety Tip: How to Build a Sandbag Dike-0

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    If floodwaters are threatening your home, use sandbags to create a dike.

    Pick a Spot 
    Build the dike on the side of your yard from which water will be flowing. Don’t erect the dike against a wall: The weight of the sandbags might compromise the building’s structure.

    Fill the Bags 
    Put the first scoop of sand just inside the bag’s mouth to hold it open, then fill it halfway full before tying off the top.

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  • August 28, 2012

    Hurricane Safety Tip: Prepare a Checklist for Your Home-0

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    If a hurricane is forecast, stay glued to weather reports, and if evacuation is advised, go. But if you have the all-clear to stick it out, ready yourself and your home.
     
    - Stock up on nonperishable foods, prescriptions, and hygiene essentials.
    - Cover windows with plywood. Use wood screws, not nails, anchored into exterior walls.
    - Lash down (or stow indoors) anything from your yard that might become a flying projectile in a storm.
    - Assess which trees might be blown onto the house. Trim limbs that seem vulnerable, and avoid rooms under big trees once the storm starts.

    [ Read Full Post ]
  • August 28, 2012

    Hurricane Safety Tip: Reinforce Garage Doors in a Windstorm-0

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    Battening down the hatches to prepare for a storm? Don’t forget the garage. Double-wide garage doors are a weak spot in a windstorm, as high winds can cause these broad, flexible doors to bow inward and fall off their tracks. And that makes your garage, car, and home vulnerable to greater damage.

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  • August 27, 2012

    Survival Skills: Avoid These 5 Shelter Mistakes -2

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    A good shelter with a few fatal flaws isn’t a very good shelter at all. Over the years, I have seen some awful blunders (and made a few myself) in the art of shelter building. Here are five of the most common mistakes.

    Improperly Secured
    This one stems from a modern-day affliction: the inability to use one’s hands effectively. So many people no longer do any significant manual labor in their daily life, that most of the world has forgotten how to build or make anything, tie knots, or do much else that is actually productive. Thankfully, this is a problem that can be resolved. Learn to work with your hands and learn to tie some knots. Check out our Knot Gallery for tips and instructions if you are short on knot tying skills.

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  • August 27, 2012

    How to Sharpen a Knife: 10 Tips for at Home and in the Field-3

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    It has been argued by more than a few outdoor enthusiasts whether a sharp knife or a dull knife is more dangerous to the user. The logic has always been that the dull knife might not plunge as deeply into you as the sharp blade, but the more jagged wound may take longer to heal (not to mention that you have to push harder to even use the dull knife, increasing the likelihood of a mishap).

    So let’s take the dull knife issue off the table by learning some sharpening tricks that work at home AND in the field. 

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  • August 23, 2012

    How to Avoid Bee Stings and Wasp Stings-9

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    There’s nothing quite like stumbling across a bee hive, hornet colony, or wasp nest at the end of the season when their ranks have swollen to the maximum from a productive queen.

    These venom-slinging sharp shooters kill 50 to 100 people worldwide each year, which is greater than the number of people killed by all the other venomous creatures combined.

    If that wasn’t bad enough, the end of the season makes many wasps extra feisty. The queens are usually the only wasps and hornets that hibernate through the winter, which means that all the worker hornets and wasps get kicked out as the hive disbands at the end of the summer. These pissed-off, displaced insects know their time is short and always seem most aggressive just before the first frost.

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