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10 Survival Tricks For A Lexan Water Bottle

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June 25, 2012
10 Survival Tricks For A Lexan Water Bottle - 2

The ability to store and transport water is a huge part of any good survival strategy, especially in a dry climate. But that heavy duty Lexan plastic bottle is more than just a one-trick pony. Lexan plastic is shatter-resistant and can withstand boiling temperatures. Here are ten other survival chores that your water bottle can perform beyond just holding your drinking water.

1. Waterproof Survival Kit: Since a water bottle won’t let water out, it also won’t let water inside (unless it sinks to a depth that has high enough pressure to cause the lid to leak). Stuff a water bottle with survival equipment to keep the gear dry and in one place. If it’s brightly colored, it’ll be easier to find. If you don’t overload the bottle, it can even float.

2. Boil in your bottle:
While you shouldn’t try to put your Lexan plastic bottle over a fire to boil water in it, you can put the heat of a fire inside the bottle. Drop small, hot stones in the bottle of water to boil it and kill any pathogens that would make you sick.

3. Cooking: Similar to the boiling trick, you can also use water and hot rocks to cook food in your bottle. Try to cook foods that stay together well, will fit easily inside the bottle, and are easy to remove, like small shellfish and crawdads. You can also make tea and coffee in your bottle with a hot rock.

4. Float:
Use your empty bottle to make a float for the end of a jug line for fishing, or put it inside your shirt to help you stay afloat in a marine emergency.

5. Pee Bottle:
A CLEARLY MARKED bottle can save you from making the cold trek outside during a winter camp out or emergency.

6. Lantern: Throw your headlamp or a flashlight in a light-colored, empty water bottle to make a cool lantern. This becomes an even better trick if you are in wet conditions and your light is not waterproof. You can also get bottle caps that light up, which, when added to a bottle full of water, make for a very cool looking lantern.

7. First Aid Kit: Keeping gauze and dressings dry is a big part of keeping them sterile. The lightweight nature of most first aid supplies will easily make this kit a float.

8. Cold Compress: Put some snow or ice inside your bottle to create a cold compress for injuries like sprains and strains.

9. Tool Kit: Store tools, loose parts and important equipment in the bottle to keep it dry and organized.

10. Hot Water Bottle: Fill up your bottle with very hot water, screw the lid on tight and stick it inside a thick sock. Hold this insulated warming bottle inside your clothes, or sleep with it in very cold weather. This trick will make your bedding or sleeping bag feel 20 degrees warmer for several hours.

Tell us in the comments what survival chores you perform with your water bottle.

Comments (2)

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from Tanis01 6/29/2012 at 11:20pm

Not Nalgene, but...
'Wife does home health physical therapy. Recently goes to a patient's home and notices his plastic bedside urinal contains a dark liquid. Justifiably alarmed, she suggests calling his MD immediately. Turns out, the old-timer was not only doing his natural business in the container, but spitting his chaw juice in it too. When the home health nurse arrives, my wife informs her of the incident, so the nurse forked over two brand new urinals for him: one clearly marked tobacco, the other marked PISS. No confusin' those now!

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from mdsulli2 6/26/2012 at 11:46am

Good post Tim,
My survival kit is a quart sized, translusent orange lexan water bottle. It holds everything you need to servive. A carabiner attatches it to belt or backpack. The space blancket is hard to get in and out but it works great. Hope I never need it!

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from mdsulli2 6/26/2012 at 11:46am

Good post Tim,
My survival kit is a quart sized, translusent orange lexan water bottle. It holds everything you need to servive. A carabiner attatches it to belt or backpack. The space blancket is hard to get in and out but it works great. Hope I never need it!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tanis01 6/29/2012 at 11:20pm

Not Nalgene, but...
'Wife does home health physical therapy. Recently goes to a patient's home and notices his plastic bedside urinal contains a dark liquid. Justifiably alarmed, she suggests calling his MD immediately. Turns out, the old-timer was not only doing his natural business in the container, but spitting his chaw juice in it too. When the home health nurse arrives, my wife informs her of the incident, so the nurse forked over two brand new urinals for him: one clearly marked tobacco, the other marked PISS. No confusin' those now!

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Write a Comment Your comment (200 characters or less):