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Survival Gear: How To Build a Survival Repair Kit

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February 04, 2013
Survival Gear: How To Build a Survival Repair Kit - 5

There are countless different survival kit iterations out there, both on store shelves and assembled at home. Many of these kits include a few multi-use items—like needles, duct tape, and dental floss—that can be used for gear repair.

Since your gear can literally save your life if you run into trouble, why not take gear repair a little more seriously by building a dedicate repair kit within your survival kit?

9 Items For Gear Repair
Duct Tape: From patching holes in hydration bladders and canteens, to taping your boots back together, duct tape is a modern marvel that can repair or replace hundreds of camping, hunting, and survival items.

Floss and Thread: I keep dozens of yards of each in my repair kit. Floss is a strong fiber and ideal for a number of repairs, but sometimes a heavy sewing thread is a better match for stitching clothes, fabrics, and gear back together.

Needles: Since needles are so easily lost or broken, you need several of them in your repair kit. Stout canvas needles can be used on heavy, coarsely woven materials. Finer needles can be used for most everything else. Throw in a few glover’s needles for leather work, too. 

Super Glue: A little one-ounce tube of super glue can get many items back in working order. Be sure to store it in its own plastic bag, in case it leaks.

Matches or Lighter:
While a repair kit is a great place to store a back-up fire starter, a small lighter or book of paper matches can also help you fix things by giving you the heat to melt ropes, webbing, and other plastic gear.  

Buttons: Buttons might not seem like priority items, but have you ever tried hiking over unforgiving terrain and holding up your pants with one hand? Trust me, buttons are good.

Razor Blade:
These are handy in that they are small and lightweight and extremely sharp. Since repairs often involve cutting materials, a back-up blade can be a valuable asset.

Wire: A few feet of small-gauge steel wire could be used as a snare, but it can also be used for certain types of repairs, such as mending fishing equipment, flashlights, etc.

Safety Pins:
When there’s no time for stitching, a few safety pins might hold something together for a while longer. 

Do you carry a repair kit in your gear? Let us know what’s in there by leaving us a comment below.

 

Comments (5)

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from Brian Hook 9/2/2013 at 01:47pm

I this this survival kit is a good starting point. However, I like to add a pocket and knife and some sort of flashlight to the kit as well.

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from Tioughnioga 8/6/2013 at 01:26pm

I like zip-ties myself, and of course duct tape (although, due to space considerations, what I have in my kit is actually a small roll of first-aid tape, also good stuff). I have to say, though, that you really can't ignore how useful plain old needle and thread can be (or needle and monofilament, or better yet, needle and Spiderwire!). I carried various repair items for a long time before I admitted that with many of them, I was just avoiding needle and thread. It sure isn't a quick fix, but it's a good fix.

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from Bob Hansen 4/21/2013 at 05:40pm

Hi...

Another important repair item is the horse blanket (safety) pin. May not be to easy to find, although they are available on the 'web.

They typically are about four inches long, and can have many uses...such as a temporary fix for your snowmobile suit zipper that just malfunctioned. Or a temp fix for a broken pack strap or sternum strap, etc. Works great...!!

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from cooreva 2/8/2013 at 05:05pm

You can add a hot glue stick to the kit, use the match to melt the glue, is excellent for fabrics.
Also you can add urethane glue for shoe, tent, pack repair "seam grip" is the brand
And finally zip ties I have fixed wipers and office equipment with those
a repair kit for inflatable mattresses is also a must, if you use them, otherwise you'll loose most of the mattress functionality

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from jcarlin 2/5/2013 at 08:52am

I wouldn't say I ever thought of it as a dedicated repair kit, but all of my "first aid kits" have morphed into at least minimalist survival kits.
From the repair side, they all have at least a few feet of duct tape, paracord, some wire, monofilament, safety pins(I don't have buttons, but I have once used a heavy safety pin to keep my hiking shorts closed) a knife/mulititool, scissors, and lighter and matches.

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Write a Comment Your comment (200 characters or less):

from jcarlin 2/5/2013 at 08:52am

I wouldn't say I ever thought of it as a dedicated repair kit, but all of my "first aid kits" have morphed into at least minimalist survival kits.
From the repair side, they all have at least a few feet of duct tape, paracord, some wire, monofilament, safety pins(I don't have buttons, but I have once used a heavy safety pin to keep my hiking shorts closed) a knife/mulititool, scissors, and lighter and matches.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from cooreva 2/8/2013 at 05:05pm

You can add a hot glue stick to the kit, use the match to melt the glue, is excellent for fabrics.
Also you can add urethane glue for shoe, tent, pack repair "seam grip" is the brand
And finally zip ties I have fixed wipers and office equipment with those
a repair kit for inflatable mattresses is also a must, if you use them, otherwise you'll loose most of the mattress functionality

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bob Hansen 4/21/2013 at 05:40pm

Hi...

Another important repair item is the horse blanket (safety) pin. May not be to easy to find, although they are available on the 'web.

They typically are about four inches long, and can have many uses...such as a temporary fix for your snowmobile suit zipper that just malfunctioned. Or a temp fix for a broken pack strap or sternum strap, etc. Works great...!!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tioughnioga 8/6/2013 at 01:26pm

I like zip-ties myself, and of course duct tape (although, due to space considerations, what I have in my kit is actually a small roll of first-aid tape, also good stuff). I have to say, though, that you really can't ignore how useful plain old needle and thread can be (or needle and monofilament, or better yet, needle and Spiderwire!). I carried various repair items for a long time before I admitted that with many of them, I was just avoiding needle and thread. It sure isn't a quick fix, but it's a good fix.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Brian Hook 9/2/2013 at 01:47pm

I this this survival kit is a good starting point. However, I like to add a pocket and knife and some sort of flashlight to the kit as well.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Write a Comment Your comment (200 characters or less):

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