Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Survival Gear Review: The Vulture Cholera Knife

Search this blog

Categories

Recent Posts

Archives

Syndicate

Survivalist
In your Inbox

Enter your email address to get our new post everyday.

June 06, 2014
Survival Gear Review: The Vulture Cholera Knife - 3

Earlier this year, Vulture Equipment Works debuted their new Cholera fixed-blade knife at SHOT Show, where it was declared “People's Choice Knife Shot Show 2014.” That’s quite an endorsement, but will I make this knife my choice for a wilderness EDC blade? Follow along and find out.

First things first, I had to ask what was up with the name “Cholera?” Normally you’d want to avoid something like cholera, right? It turns out that this catchy bug is one of many pathogens that can live in the guts of a vulture (the company’s “mascot”). President and Chief Designer of Vulture, William Egbert Jr., spent years of R&D coming up with this wicked blade design, and he says a nasty knife name was just what he wanted. Fair enough.

So what kind of knife would carry such a name? The overall blade design is a modified gyuto knife. The Japanese word “gyuto” translates to "meat sword" in English. I did some carving on a venison quarter in my kitchen to get a feel for its butchering capabilities and can confirm that the meat sword moniker is fitting. But there are more chores in the wilderness than just butchering meat. My next task was fabricating some trap parts. This bigger than average blade performed like a smaller blade when carving wood. Usually, large blades lose effectiveness for small tasks, but not the Cholera. It has a great feel, and the shaping details of the handle are quite comfortable.

What about the blade?

The steel is heat-treated 1095 high-carbon alloy steel with a Scandi grind profile, which I believe to be the best profile for butchering and wood carving. The blade is made more durable with a clear Cerakote finish. You can also drill and pierce with this knife, thanks to the false edge at the tip of the knife’s spine. Dark linen Micarta handle scales give you a good grip on the knife, wet or dry. Additionally, there is a recess in the blade with a tapered notch for striking the firesteel that’s included in the set. This firesteel fits snugly in the Kydex sheath, and is composed of one ferrocerium rod and two 3/16-inch magnesium rods to create an extremely hot ignition. Vulture’s impressive blade is a fine example of their company philosophy, "Build It Right & Build It American."  This is the best new knife I have worked with this year, and I can’t wait to use it in my next survival class.

Here are the specs:
Blade Length: 5.5”
Overall Length: 10”
Blade Thickness: 3/16”
Knife Weight: 9.5 oz.
Knife, sheath and fire starter weight: 13 oz.
Origin: USA
Price: $190

Comments (3)

» Write a Comment
Top Rated
All Comments
from T-Mac 6/10/2014 at 06:40pm

Thanks for your comments Bob and Pete! Knife longevity and durability are huge factors for me too, Pete. Congrats to you on making your own blades and tools, while most of the rest of us are just buying them. I will beat-up the Vulture Cholera a lot more and report back. Based on the steel and the grind, I expect it to outlast me. We'll see...

Thanks for reading, guys!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pete in Alaska 6/9/2014 at 07:53pm

Hi Tim, As an evening and weekend knife maker of many years I was interested in your impression of this blade. Its design reflects thought and intelligent use of materials. It seems a bit spendy but not outrageously so. Its a bit above my dollar cap and given the number of other excellent blades out there for less money. I believe in getting the very best one can afford this blade looks to be one of those even if you may have at save a bit for it.
The only question is how the blade would hold up to hard and extreme conditions and use. Carving meat and whittling wood is of importance but not of hight importance were one may find themselves in a survival situation. Yup, 1095 HC Steel is great material. . . . How does it hold up in this blade? How about a real test of its abilities?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bob Hansen 6/8/2014 at 12:17pm

Hi..

Looks like a great knife, Tim. I'll try to find a friend who has more money than I have, and tell him I have a birthday coming up...!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report

Write a Comment Your comment (200 characters or less):

from Bob Hansen 6/8/2014 at 12:17pm

Hi..

Looks like a great knife, Tim. I'll try to find a friend who has more money than I have, and tell him I have a birthday coming up...!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pete in Alaska 6/9/2014 at 07:53pm

Hi Tim, As an evening and weekend knife maker of many years I was interested in your impression of this blade. Its design reflects thought and intelligent use of materials. It seems a bit spendy but not outrageously so. Its a bit above my dollar cap and given the number of other excellent blades out there for less money. I believe in getting the very best one can afford this blade looks to be one of those even if you may have at save a bit for it.
The only question is how the blade would hold up to hard and extreme conditions and use. Carving meat and whittling wood is of importance but not of hight importance were one may find themselves in a survival situation. Yup, 1095 HC Steel is great material. . . . How does it hold up in this blade? How about a real test of its abilities?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from T-Mac 6/10/2014 at 06:40pm

Thanks for your comments Bob and Pete! Knife longevity and durability are huge factors for me too, Pete. Congrats to you on making your own blades and tools, while most of the rest of us are just buying them. I will beat-up the Vulture Cholera a lot more and report back. Based on the steel and the grind, I expect it to outlast me. We'll see...

Thanks for reading, guys!

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Write a Comment Your comment (200 characters or less):

bmxbiz