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Hurricane Survival Guide

Hurricane Survival Guide

Our comprehensive guide will teach you how to stay safe when a hurricane hits.
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from Bob Hansen wrote 2 years 34 weeks ago

Excellent presentation...well done...!!

Bob Hansen/Pathfinder1

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from s.f.wilson wrote 3 years 33 weeks ago

If Katrina taught us anything about hurricanes it's that when one hits your house you get lots of free stuff

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from pineywoods wrote 4 years 32 weeks ago

Photographs can't even come close to showing the destruction of a hurricane. When you're actually there, there is an overwhelming sense of devastation: the leaves are gone from the trees at the wrong time of year, it's hot and the power is off for the foreseeable future, snakes, insects and animals have been displaced and are surly. It stinks.

I "rode out" Fredrick in 1979 (on a boat in a protected anchorage) and since then, I've evacuated at the first opportunity when one is likely to hit where I live. You don't "take care" of anything when one of those boogers hits when you're close to the center; you just hang on and watch things fly by and try to stay in a place where they don't hit you and you keep hoping that the water doesn't get any higher.

Looking at photos of a hurricane is sort of like watching a video of a turkey hunt. It ain't even close to the real experience, but unlike a turkey hunt, you don't want to be there for the real thing.

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from seadog wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I was in South Dade County when Hurricane Andrew hit in 1992--my wife was pregnant & my older boys were 1 and 2 years old. We came through it OK, but some of what I saw makes these pics look tame.

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from jacy1515 wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

Have rode out a lot of these buggers and every second is filled with anxiety.Got some cooler weather headed to te gulf it will help.

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from jacy1515 wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

One more month and the odds turn in our favor
Alabamaoutlaw

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from www.dropjhook.com wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

Now i see why so many people are moving to Montana

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from jburgman wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

Great gallery--some really sad, horrifying photos there. The power of nature never ceases to amaze me.

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from jacy1515 wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

One more month and the odds turn in our favor
Alabamaoutlaw

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jacy1515 wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

Have rode out a lot of these buggers and every second is filled with anxiety.Got some cooler weather headed to te gulf it will help.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from seadog wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I was in South Dade County when Hurricane Andrew hit in 1992--my wife was pregnant & my older boys were 1 and 2 years old. We came through it OK, but some of what I saw makes these pics look tame.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from pineywoods wrote 4 years 32 weeks ago

Photographs can't even come close to showing the destruction of a hurricane. When you're actually there, there is an overwhelming sense of devastation: the leaves are gone from the trees at the wrong time of year, it's hot and the power is off for the foreseeable future, snakes, insects and animals have been displaced and are surly. It stinks.

I "rode out" Fredrick in 1979 (on a boat in a protected anchorage) and since then, I've evacuated at the first opportunity when one is likely to hit where I live. You don't "take care" of anything when one of those boogers hits when you're close to the center; you just hang on and watch things fly by and try to stay in a place where they don't hit you and you keep hoping that the water doesn't get any higher.

Looking at photos of a hurricane is sort of like watching a video of a turkey hunt. It ain't even close to the real experience, but unlike a turkey hunt, you don't want to be there for the real thing.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jburgman wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

Great gallery--some really sad, horrifying photos there. The power of nature never ceases to amaze me.

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from www.dropjhook.com wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

Now i see why so many people are moving to Montana

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from s.f.wilson wrote 3 years 33 weeks ago

If Katrina taught us anything about hurricanes it's that when one hits your house you get lots of free stuff

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from Bob Hansen wrote 2 years 34 weeks ago

Excellent presentation...well done...!!

Bob Hansen/Pathfinder1

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