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How to Survive Field Injuries

How to Survive Field Injuries

From snake bites to sore teeth, this guide will help you tackle almost any accident.
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snakebites

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from traprunner 5/25/2010 at 12:27pm

It would help but only selective situations such as a hook in the hand leg or arm

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from rtstage 4/10/2010 at 02:41pm

ITS GOOD TO NO ABOUT OIL OF LAVENDER I HAVE USED UNFILTERD VINGER FOR THE SAME THING.ITS ALSO GOOD FOR CUTS AND SCRAPES IT TAKES THE STING OUT RIGHT AWAY .FOR BEE STINGS BUG BITES I USE TEE TREE OIL ITS LIKE A FIRST AID KIT IN A BOTTLE NO RED MARK

RTSTAGE

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dixie Bitch 11/19/2009 at 11:34am

One item to have in your pack is essential oil of lavendar. This is an all natural essential oil that will take care of a burn. It was discovered by accident in France by a chemist who got burned and plunged his hand into what he thought was a container of cold water. It was essential oil of lavendar and the burn did not even blister. I keep it in my kitchen and workshop both. I have been burned many times and do not even have the scars to show for it. Yes, Essential Oil of Lavendar (EOL) will even keep the area from scaring, at least for first and second degree burns. Case in point, I was working in a funnel cake booth at the local county fair for a friend of mine to help out and got splashed with 350 degree oil to the back of my leg. I put EOL on it immediately and covered it with a 4X$ gauze pad with the oil in it. Blisters had already begun to form and a paramedic wanted to place sulfadene cream on it and I refused. The next day the paramedic came by with the cream again and said he figured I would need it by then and I took off the EOL dressing and showed him a leg that was a little pink with NO blisters and no problems. Next day the dressing was gone and so was the burn.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Ross 10/29/2009 at 04:01pm

Snakebite, I'm a noodler and caught snakes and was bit twice but no venom was injected. My buddy was immuned to cottonmouths. You can take a stun gun and shock around the bite a few times and it neutralises the poison. It also works on spiders. My wife and daughter was shocked and it healed within a few days. A Dr. did it but its not approved by the F.D.A. But it works and the meat won't decay. It works on mosquitos and ticks. Alot of people are scared of the noise and flash on a stun gun but when my neck hurts I will drown it out. Don't use one for protection at all. A taser is different and it will nock you down. Try it if you get bit and it will make you a believer. I carry mine whenever I'm around a snakey area. But there are good snakes that eat poison one which is a king snake. I turn them loose in my house. They eat mice and bugs also. Research my method and its supported by a few thats tried it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from cbarron28 6/22/2009 at 02:03pm

The scalp wound treatment they show here is the real deal. When I was six years old living in a remote fishing village on Vancouver Island I cut my head open for what would normally be around 8-10 stitches. Being such a remote place, medical supplies were rather tough to come by. The doctor tied my hair exactly like the picture shows but used glue to help keep the knots cinched. I don't remember what kind of glue was used but in a pinch I bet I'd use just about anything.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Band-aid MT 4/17/2009 at 04:52pm

Something on spinal inj. When in the field it is difficult to keep from compramising the stabilization while also trying to remove the victim. operationaly we can rule out serious injury.
1) Was the incident likely to cause inj. (mechanism) for instance
a fall on the head or more than 10 feet.
2) Is there pain, the injured knows his body
3) Check for tenderness by touch
4) Check for deformities in the neck vertabrae
5) Numbness or tingling in arms,legs,hands or feet
6) Is the injured distracted by a possibly more significant pain
(adrenaline, animal encounter etc.)
7) Is there pain in movement of the necks complete rotation.

A note in my experiances is that if there is an injury the person usually will know it. This does not mean we should not be careful. Any injured person needs to seek medical attention. These tests can be very helpful to calm all involved, and are a relief in the event the injured is forced to walk himself (or herself)out. You can do these simple checks on yourself, but you must be humble enough to accept any negative findings.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bo 4/12/2009 at 09:25pm

For info on the Aussie wrap, Band-aid MT talked about here is a great website discussing that and other treatment considerations in the field. http://www.surviveoutdoors.com/reference/snakes/snake-bites.asp

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from CharlieEcho 4/9/2009 at 04:20pm

Band-aid MT; I did find these posts from both you and BO helpful and interesting. I've gone on to search more info. It's been 25 years since I entered the woods seriously. I fished, climbed and hunted when younger. No I've retired and things have changed a bit. I'll be back here for more at OL.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Band-aid MT 4/9/2009 at 01:55pm

Hello I am a new member of the websight lifer of the magazine. As an experianced US Army Medic, I have some remote medicine Experiance learned info. about burns and bites to share.
Burns, whatch body temp. The skin is compramised and the body can't regulate heat as well. Saran wrap can work as a secondary skin to help hold in heat and keep clean,or a dry sterile( @ least as clean as possible) is one of the best routes.
The dressings work great,especially for comfort, however you must watch infection, again with skin compramise. Anything wet attracks dirt. If you can't keep it clean don't use it. Try to keep fingurs and toes individually wrapped to avoid damaged tissue from fusing. This is the one place where moisture is most helpful.
Snake bites, the only thing I have to add is, if you live in a snake filled area, you may look into learning what an Aussie wrap is. I learned it from an Australian SF medic. Leave the sight exposed and wrap an Ace wrap (elastic bandage) start 6" above the sight and wrap farely tight at the top loosening as you go down to the sight. What you are doing, as with the string version above, is allowing blood to the limb but slowing the infection through the surface viens back to the heart. i'll try to find a websight that shows examples, to post. hope this is helpful.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Band-aid MT 4/9/2009 at 01:55pm

Hello I am a new member of the websight lifer of the magazine. As an experianced US Army Medic, I have some remote medicine Experiance learned info. about burns and bites to share.
Burns, whatch body temp. The skin is compramised and the body can't regulate heat as well. Saran wrap can work as a secondary skin to help hold in heat and keep clean,or a dry sterile( @ least as clean as possible) is one of the best routes.
The dressings work great,especially for comfort, however you must watch infection, again with skin compramise. Anything wet attracks dirt. If you can't keep it clean don't use it. Try to keep fingurs and toes individually wrapped to avoid damaged tissue from fusing. This is the one place where moisture is most helpful.
Snake bites, the only thing I have to add is, if you live in a snake filled area, you may look into learning what an Aussie wrap is. I learned it from an Australian SF medic. Leave the sight exposed and wrap an Ace wrap (elastic bandage) start 6" above the sight and wrap farely tight at the top loosening as you go down to the sight. What you are doing, as with the string version above, is allowing blood to the limb but slowing the infection through the surface viens back to the heart. i'll try to find a websight that shows examples, to post. hope this is helpful.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from ye ole coaste 3/3/2009 at 06:09pm

2Bad BO retired thats the medic id want to stich me togehter!!Many good course's out there to take BEFORE hand not after trouble strikes.Great article very useful. Carry ON!! YOC

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bo 3/1/2009 at 11:01pm

Speaking as a retired ER RN,
Burns:
No 1. Under no circumstances should you debride (remove or cut away)the skin or break blisters in the field, UNLESS you have been trained to do so, be it as a medic with certification or recognized health care professional. I have seen more damage done by well-intentioned, but untrained "Good Samaritans" in the field who did not realize the further injury they were causing.
No 2.Silver sulfadiazine cream (SSD, Silvadene Cream)is recommended for burns, but only if the patient is not allergic to sulfa drugs. If they are and the SSD is put on the burn, the burn will be the least of his problems. If he survives the allergic reaction ranging from mild to a full blown anaphylactic reaction (he probably will not survive that without specific and rapid emergency intervention), be prepared to meet the individual or his survivors in a courtroom or pay all of the soon to be possibly extensive (and expensive) medical treatment.
No 3. I don't know what is meant by a 16 inch layer of cream on the burn. A very thin layer is all that is required. The bigger tubes are only 6-8 inches long and maybe 1.5 to possibly 2 inches wide.
For teeth,
I had to replace one of my son's upper incisors (front teeth) when it was knocked out in a fall. You can place it in milk but it has to be replaced within 30 minutes. Even then it may not make it the longer the time it takes to replace the tooth the likelihood of successful reimplantation diminishes greatly. My son's tooth was replaced within 5 minutes and although he did end up having a root canal he still has the tooth many years later. DO NOT touch any part of the root as you can destroy the tissue that is needed for the tooth to be maintained. Wash it off gently, saline (contact lens saline can be used to wash it off but do not touch the root.)
For shoulder dislocations,
unless you are trained to recognize this injury and fail to discern the difference between a fracture and a dislocation you can cause far more injury even the loss of the limb. I have seen this too many times in the ER.
For Head injuries,
recognizing pupil changes is a late sign and if you are seeing that you are in more trouble than you know. The victim needs to evacuated immediately if he is to survive, (evacuation at the time of injury when a head injury is suspected is best.)
Overall the best thing to do is to take a first aid course by a recognized agency such as American Red Cross. An EMT course is even better. You will be much better prepared to deal when you come face to face with an injured victim.

+9 Good Comment? | | Report
from outdoors man 2/26/2009 at 04:41pm

dont back hook out if by eye or artery

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bob 2/19/2009 at 03:26pm

Are you quite sure about applying ointment to burns? I know I've read many times that this should never be done.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from mdsulli2 2/16/2009 at 03:44pm

I was hooked as a child and the doctor cliped the end off and pushed the hook through. The barb will cause more damage on the way out than it did on the way in. I would imagine that the depth of the hook would determine the best course of action.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Yoda 2/15/2009 at 10:25pm

i've been told that you can also place a lost tooth into a cup of milk to keep the roots alive for a while to get a dentist to re-attach if it won't take by shoving it back in.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report

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from Bo 3/1/2009 at 11:01pm

Speaking as a retired ER RN,
Burns:
No 1. Under no circumstances should you debride (remove or cut away)the skin or break blisters in the field, UNLESS you have been trained to do so, be it as a medic with certification or recognized health care professional. I have seen more damage done by well-intentioned, but untrained "Good Samaritans" in the field who did not realize the further injury they were causing.
No 2.Silver sulfadiazine cream (SSD, Silvadene Cream)is recommended for burns, but only if the patient is not allergic to sulfa drugs. If they are and the SSD is put on the burn, the burn will be the least of his problems. If he survives the allergic reaction ranging from mild to a full blown anaphylactic reaction (he probably will not survive that without specific and rapid emergency intervention), be prepared to meet the individual or his survivors in a courtroom or pay all of the soon to be possibly extensive (and expensive) medical treatment.
No 3. I don't know what is meant by a 16 inch layer of cream on the burn. A very thin layer is all that is required. The bigger tubes are only 6-8 inches long and maybe 1.5 to possibly 2 inches wide.
For teeth,
I had to replace one of my son's upper incisors (front teeth) when it was knocked out in a fall. You can place it in milk but it has to be replaced within 30 minutes. Even then it may not make it the longer the time it takes to replace the tooth the likelihood of successful reimplantation diminishes greatly. My son's tooth was replaced within 5 minutes and although he did end up having a root canal he still has the tooth many years later. DO NOT touch any part of the root as you can destroy the tissue that is needed for the tooth to be maintained. Wash it off gently, saline (contact lens saline can be used to wash it off but do not touch the root.)
For shoulder dislocations,
unless you are trained to recognize this injury and fail to discern the difference between a fracture and a dislocation you can cause far more injury even the loss of the limb. I have seen this too many times in the ER.
For Head injuries,
recognizing pupil changes is a late sign and if you are seeing that you are in more trouble than you know. The victim needs to evacuated immediately if he is to survive, (evacuation at the time of injury when a head injury is suspected is best.)
Overall the best thing to do is to take a first aid course by a recognized agency such as American Red Cross. An EMT course is even better. You will be much better prepared to deal when you come face to face with an injured victim.

+9 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dixie Bitch 11/19/2009 at 11:34am

One item to have in your pack is essential oil of lavendar. This is an all natural essential oil that will take care of a burn. It was discovered by accident in France by a chemist who got burned and plunged his hand into what he thought was a container of cold water. It was essential oil of lavendar and the burn did not even blister. I keep it in my kitchen and workshop both. I have been burned many times and do not even have the scars to show for it. Yes, Essential Oil of Lavendar (EOL) will even keep the area from scaring, at least for first and second degree burns. Case in point, I was working in a funnel cake booth at the local county fair for a friend of mine to help out and got splashed with 350 degree oil to the back of my leg. I put EOL on it immediately and covered it with a 4X$ gauze pad with the oil in it. Blisters had already begun to form and a paramedic wanted to place sulfadene cream on it and I refused. The next day the paramedic came by with the cream again and said he figured I would need it by then and I took off the EOL dressing and showed him a leg that was a little pink with NO blisters and no problems. Next day the dressing was gone and so was the burn.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Band-aid MT 4/9/2009 at 01:55pm

Hello I am a new member of the websight lifer of the magazine. As an experianced US Army Medic, I have some remote medicine Experiance learned info. about burns and bites to share.
Burns, whatch body temp. The skin is compramised and the body can't regulate heat as well. Saran wrap can work as a secondary skin to help hold in heat and keep clean,or a dry sterile( @ least as clean as possible) is one of the best routes.
The dressings work great,especially for comfort, however you must watch infection, again with skin compramise. Anything wet attracks dirt. If you can't keep it clean don't use it. Try to keep fingurs and toes individually wrapped to avoid damaged tissue from fusing. This is the one place where moisture is most helpful.
Snake bites, the only thing I have to add is, if you live in a snake filled area, you may look into learning what an Aussie wrap is. I learned it from an Australian SF medic. Leave the sight exposed and wrap an Ace wrap (elastic bandage) start 6" above the sight and wrap farely tight at the top loosening as you go down to the sight. What you are doing, as with the string version above, is allowing blood to the limb but slowing the infection through the surface viens back to the heart. i'll try to find a websight that shows examples, to post. hope this is helpful.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Band-aid MT 4/17/2009 at 04:52pm

Something on spinal inj. When in the field it is difficult to keep from compramising the stabilization while also trying to remove the victim. operationaly we can rule out serious injury.
1) Was the incident likely to cause inj. (mechanism) for instance
a fall on the head or more than 10 feet.
2) Is there pain, the injured knows his body
3) Check for tenderness by touch
4) Check for deformities in the neck vertabrae
5) Numbness or tingling in arms,legs,hands or feet
6) Is the injured distracted by a possibly more significant pain
(adrenaline, animal encounter etc.)
7) Is there pain in movement of the necks complete rotation.

A note in my experiances is that if there is an injury the person usually will know it. This does not mean we should not be careful. Any injured person needs to seek medical attention. These tests can be very helpful to calm all involved, and are a relief in the event the injured is forced to walk himself (or herself)out. You can do these simple checks on yourself, but you must be humble enough to accept any negative findings.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Yoda 2/15/2009 at 10:25pm

i've been told that you can also place a lost tooth into a cup of milk to keep the roots alive for a while to get a dentist to re-attach if it won't take by shoving it back in.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from mdsulli2 2/16/2009 at 03:44pm

I was hooked as a child and the doctor cliped the end off and pushed the hook through. The barb will cause more damage on the way out than it did on the way in. I would imagine that the depth of the hook would determine the best course of action.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from ye ole coaste 3/3/2009 at 06:09pm

2Bad BO retired thats the medic id want to stich me togehter!!Many good course's out there to take BEFORE hand not after trouble strikes.Great article very useful. Carry ON!! YOC

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from outdoors man 2/26/2009 at 04:41pm

dont back hook out if by eye or artery

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Band-aid MT 4/9/2009 at 01:55pm

Hello I am a new member of the websight lifer of the magazine. As an experianced US Army Medic, I have some remote medicine Experiance learned info. about burns and bites to share.
Burns, whatch body temp. The skin is compramised and the body can't regulate heat as well. Saran wrap can work as a secondary skin to help hold in heat and keep clean,or a dry sterile( @ least as clean as possible) is one of the best routes.
The dressings work great,especially for comfort, however you must watch infection, again with skin compramise. Anything wet attracks dirt. If you can't keep it clean don't use it. Try to keep fingurs and toes individually wrapped to avoid damaged tissue from fusing. This is the one place where moisture is most helpful.
Snake bites, the only thing I have to add is, if you live in a snake filled area, you may look into learning what an Aussie wrap is. I learned it from an Australian SF medic. Leave the sight exposed and wrap an Ace wrap (elastic bandage) start 6" above the sight and wrap farely tight at the top loosening as you go down to the sight. What you are doing, as with the string version above, is allowing blood to the limb but slowing the infection through the surface viens back to the heart. i'll try to find a websight that shows examples, to post. hope this is helpful.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from CharlieEcho 4/9/2009 at 04:20pm

Band-aid MT; I did find these posts from both you and BO helpful and interesting. I've gone on to search more info. It's been 25 years since I entered the woods seriously. I fished, climbed and hunted when younger. No I've retired and things have changed a bit. I'll be back here for more at OL.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from cbarron28 6/22/2009 at 02:03pm

The scalp wound treatment they show here is the real deal. When I was six years old living in a remote fishing village on Vancouver Island I cut my head open for what would normally be around 8-10 stitches. Being such a remote place, medical supplies were rather tough to come by. The doctor tied my hair exactly like the picture shows but used glue to help keep the knots cinched. I don't remember what kind of glue was used but in a pinch I bet I'd use just about anything.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bob 2/19/2009 at 03:26pm

Are you quite sure about applying ointment to burns? I know I've read many times that this should never be done.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bo 4/12/2009 at 09:25pm

For info on the Aussie wrap, Band-aid MT talked about here is a great website discussing that and other treatment considerations in the field. http://www.surviveoutdoors.com/reference/snakes/snake-bites.asp

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Ross 10/29/2009 at 04:01pm

Snakebite, I'm a noodler and caught snakes and was bit twice but no venom was injected. My buddy was immuned to cottonmouths. You can take a stun gun and shock around the bite a few times and it neutralises the poison. It also works on spiders. My wife and daughter was shocked and it healed within a few days. A Dr. did it but its not approved by the F.D.A. But it works and the meat won't decay. It works on mosquitos and ticks. Alot of people are scared of the noise and flash on a stun gun but when my neck hurts I will drown it out. Don't use one for protection at all. A taser is different and it will nock you down. Try it if you get bit and it will make you a believer. I carry mine whenever I'm around a snakey area. But there are good snakes that eat poison one which is a king snake. I turn them loose in my house. They eat mice and bugs also. Research my method and its supported by a few thats tried it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rtstage 4/10/2010 at 02:41pm

ITS GOOD TO NO ABOUT OIL OF LAVENDER I HAVE USED UNFILTERD VINGER FOR THE SAME THING.ITS ALSO GOOD FOR CUTS AND SCRAPES IT TAKES THE STING OUT RIGHT AWAY .FOR BEE STINGS BUG BITES I USE TEE TREE OIL ITS LIKE A FIRST AID KIT IN A BOTTLE NO RED MARK

RTSTAGE

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from traprunner 5/25/2010 at 12:27pm

It would help but only selective situations such as a hook in the hand leg or arm

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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