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Deadly Bugs

Deadly Bugs

Outdoorsmen should be wary of poisonous insects, such as the ones listed here.
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from Lizzypeacemaker 6/15/2011 at 08:09pm

My dad got bit once by a brown recluse. He got it right on his upper lip! He treated it with hydrogen peroxide for a week and it worked. Although I DO NOT suggest you do the same without doctors permit. My father was lucky to have been able to treat it himself!

Ducks Rule!

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from Bob Hansen 4/19/2011 at 06:21pm

Regarding Africanized honey bees...beware. They presently exist in parts of our southwest, and now are as far north as Georga...!! Per Georga Public Health.

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from Bob Hansen 4/19/2011 at 06:19pm

I got lyme disease about twenty years ago, before the MDs knew anything helpful about the treatment. I had the "usual" bullseye rash (red circle with a red "bullseye" in the center) on the outside of my left ankle. I don't think I ever had any reason to look there, and it was spotted by someone else, fortunately.

Itched like blazes, and had efter-effects for months afterwards. Even today tests for same canot always be counted on.

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from turkeybow 4/11/2011 at 05:30pm

Some helpful information on these nasty critters. However, one thing I did notice is that the author stated that the bite of a Lyme infected tick will result in a red bullseye around the bite. ***NOT ALWAYS*** Last fall I started to experience pain in my shoulders and knees and found that I was more tired than usual. I also experienced some dizziness every once in a while.I spend a lot of time outdoors: scouting, planting and working food plots, putting up treestands, turkey hunting, etc, so I did a little research and found out that all of those symptoms are indicative of Lyme Disease. I went to the Dr. and got tested and found out that I have it. Don't ask me where or when I got bit because I don't know! I was treated with Doxycycline and the symptoms have decreased but some days the knees are still sore! This year I'm spraying all of my clothes with Permethrin!

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from Tc505 4/10/2011 at 10:32pm

having lived in missouri I didn't learn about a trick until just before I left there. using a pair of panty hose under your clothing and sprayed down with deet will help avoid some of the nastier tick and chigger bites. however if you are bitten, remove the tick and use preparation H or tronolane on the bite--three times daily for about three days and there should be no more itching!!! skeeter bites and bee stings, take the leaves of a honey suckle vine--not bush. wet them and roll around in your hands and apply to affected area. will relieve the sting. a friend of mine swears by roll on deodorant for wasp and bee stings. not sure if it will work on hornet or yellow jacket stings though but it should help relieve the pain.

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from danny61 4/10/2011 at 01:09pm

How to remove a tick http://bit.ly/iaSp3o

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from danny61 4/10/2011 at 01:09pm

How to remove a tick http://bit.ly/iaSp3o

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from killercatfish 3/20/2011 at 05:34pm

toe biters inject paralyzing venom and they can get as big as a hand. wat make this so deadly is toe biters can fly and swim where humans like to swim.that inclunds michigan and the amazon river. they got there name from biting peoples toes. they drink or eat blood from the animal thay caut. it is ok to swim in michigan because they are barlay seen or found and they like fish more than human toes.

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from killercatfish 3/19/2011 at 11:01pm

sydney funnel web spiders are austalias most deadly animal. its venom can kill a human less than 45 min. thay are more deadly than a great white shark and thay are climing in peoples homes. there jaws are so strong that thay can bite though a human toenail it can cause vomiting and xtreme pian BEWARE OF THE SYDNEY FUNNEL SPIDER

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from Keenan Daniels 1/29/2011 at 03:19am

A good advertisement for extermination of species. And that Brown Recluse is the worse. Yuck.

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from hanshi 1/14/2011 at 01:10pm

I'm arachniphobic and even the sight of those things is terrifying. I'll have to admit, though, that ticks top my list of "why do they exist" creatures. With the prevalence of Lyme disease you'd think there would be definitive diagnostics and a vaccine. Medicine is primitive regardless what we've been lead to believe. If as much money were spent on medical research as on social engineering, we'd be in much better shape.

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from BugMan 12/28/2010 at 03:13pm

www.sportsmenscatalog.com has all the repellents and pesticides to protect you from this kind of problem

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from hoveysmith 12/28/2010 at 02:56am

Sometmes you don't know what got you. I was bitten by an African buffalo tick in South Africa. This one hit me under my watchband. This gave an obvious local sore. I immediately started on antibiotics that cured that (available over the counter in SA, even at shops in the airport). That took care of the tick feaver and also apparently got something else, Lyme Disease?, that was making me feel generally run-down, but with no overt sysmptoms. While blanket taking of antibiotics is not recommended for anyone, if you are not feeling good and no one can find anything, this might work.

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from hobjogus 12/25/2010 at 04:31pm

OK, there is a simple cure for the brown recluse bite. Two of my friends sons and my wife were bitten by brown recluse and the treatmet we used stoped the spread of the damaged tissue and the bite healed very rapidly. What we do is use a mini stun gun and shock around the bite several times. The electric current changes the venum to protien which the body absorbs.

Go to this web site http://spiderbitetreatment.com/minisguse.htm
where Dr. Stan Abrams explains the treatment.

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from cheapjerseys 11/23/2010 at 10:14pm

Great educational series.it's awasp not spider.

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from blake425 11/23/2010 at 09:27am

That, sir, is why I hate spiders.

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from Kerrie78 10/21/2010 at 04:11pm

I just read the article about deadly bugs. I've been battling apartment bed bugs and if it wasn't for the RPA Rental Authority Website I don't know what I would have done. There'e nothing worse that having hundreds of bugs eating you every night. Finally my bed bugs are gone, but now I'm freaked out about going camping. I don't want some tick to get me. Gross!

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from 1robtdill 8/21/2010 at 03:01pm

I was bitten, last year, by a brown recluse and can testify on the severity of these animals. The bite was on the inside of my right bicep and 36 hrs. after the bite the pain was excruciating and the flesh and muscle was being destroyed along with fever and chills. I spent 2 1/2 days in the hospital going thru 10 bags of I.V. antibotics and vicodin for pain. Not something to mess around with.

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from Daniel Ettinger 8/10/2010 at 05:05pm

I was bitten on the ankle by a Brown Recluse when I was fourteen. It put me on crutches for two weeks. I received three shots of Benadryl and at the end, all of the skin on the upper side of my foot peeled off and I had permanent muscle damage behind and above my toes. I was considered lucky not to have lost my foot.

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from Hunter Girl 1 7/17/2010 at 04:16pm

Now I'm glad I know what one looks like. Thanks.

Hunter Girl 1

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from BuckshotandBear 7/3/2010 at 01:01pm

pic 7 looks very painful I feel bad for people who get bit by that

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from rusty barfoot 6/22/2010 at 06:30pm

Best pic. of a brown recluse.Now I know what one looks like.Thanks

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from philip790 5/28/2010 at 08:23pm

Guys i am happy to say that i live in Canada where we do not have very of these bugs

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from RSL1982 5/21/2010 at 05:25pm

If you have an engourged tick, I have taken rubbing alcohol (don't use beer) and placed it on the tick. The tick begins to suffocate and will back itself out of your skin. This prevents the attempts of pulling the tick and having the head stuck which transmits the disease.

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from Old Salts 4/6/2010 at 06:11pm

There is a caterpillar in South America and the hairs are lethal and no antidote for it!

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from cgull 3/29/2010 at 03:47pm

Being alergic to most of these nasty things i hate em and do my best to keep away from them. The asp or hairy moth can really hurt when it gets inside a shirt where it can leave more stinging hairs that get into to skin and can be so painfull. I still cary scars from fire ant bites on my feet and ankles that will always be there. Fire ants are moving across the US at amazing speeds. I see them in National Forest as well as cow pastures.

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from turkey777 3/28/2010 at 05:55pm

that is crazy

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from Browning_300 3/4/2010 at 09:14pm

My uncle was logging here in the Black Hills last summer and was bitten four times by a brown recluse. The doctors didn't understand how he was able to walk into the ER. He was sick for over a month. These invertebrates are some nasty creatures

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from grousesassin 2/4/2010 at 12:39am

i got chiggerfied while on vacation...in Missouri when i was 29 first time i had ever seen a chigger nasty little buggers both my feet and my legs from the knees down looked like the pick only worse itched horribly for 3 months ..chiggers aren't much of an issue here in Minnesota but Ticks and Mosquitoes we have A Plenty.. this summer i had to have a deer tick removed twice from the pubic region they were both dug in deep not pleasent at all

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from tellmeaboutcoyo... 12/15/2009 at 08:28pm

I agree that the brown recluse is one nasty bug, this summer I was laying wires with my Uncle in Kansas. The recluse was what I was watchin out for in the crawl space I was in for awhile.

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from Dixie Bitch 11/19/2009 at 11:59am

For a bite by a brown recluse I have a remedy that is tested on myself that worked well. Take comfrey root and make a dark tea out of it. In other words put about a hand full in a pint of water and bring it to a boil take it off the heat and over it with a tight lid till it cools. Take your tea and mix a small amout with about a tablespoon of flour, just enough tea to make the flour pasty will do. place that on a 4X4 and apply directly to the bite. cover with about 3 more 4x4s and then wrap with gauze. Change this twice a day. Keep your tea in a tightly closed jar in the refridgerator and it is ok for a week. This poltice draws out the venom and also draws out the necrotic tissue. I know, I used it on a brown recluse bite on myself. I did not want to go through the whole debridement and skin grafting that the doctor said I would have to do. I even shocked the doctor by not needing the medical intervention that he was sure by spider bite would require. It should be noted that the doctor is the one who diagnosed the spider bite as a brown recluse, I had seen the spider after I swatted it but did not know what it was.

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from jdavila11 10/7/2009 at 01:35pm

this was instructional and educational and with this we can watch out for these predators when were out in the outdoors

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from teddybearbob 9/17/2009 at 10:16pm

Had a coworker get a recluse bite.Very nasty . No
he didnt develop a "spidey sense ". He caught hell for weeks over it . No one mentioned wasps and bees. They are really agressive this fall. Oven cleaner burns them right up. And chlorinated brake clean. Though its best not to bother them sometimes you have no choice when in auto salvage yards. Its best to be safe than stung.

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from Jiffins45 9/4/2009 at 06:28am

Nasty recluse spiders. I think If that happened I'd tell the doc to take of Appendage. More reasons to hate bugs.

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from deersniper 8/20/2009 at 09:28pm

No bug will keep me out of the woods.

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from TheAvonChica 8/16/2009 at 08:34pm

Lyme is beyond an epidemic, and the testing is one of the major problems. They are old, outdated and completely unreliable. The testing used was not even intended for diagnositc use, but for surveillance purposes many years ago. We need a test NOW that actually determines the presence of the lyme bacteria in our bodies 100% of the time. Until we have that, relying on a stand elisa or western blot is as helpfull as tossing a coin.

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from bigjake 8/16/2009 at 04:16pm

glad i live in the frozen north...just mosquitos to bug us here.

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from rbarker46 8/14/2009 at 04:00pm

Living in the south we have our share of all of the bugs shown in this article. Whenever I go afield I always spray my clothing with Repel's Permanone, which is a permerithin (sp) based product. You can't put it on your skin but it is highly effective on your clothing. I used to get chiggers and ticks but now if they get on my clothing, they die. I use it on my boots, socks, pants and shirt. All of the deet products really don't help with the crawly type bugs. I keep two or three cans at all times, in my truck and 4 wheeler. Believe me it works.

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from SD_Whitetail_Hntr 8/12/2009 at 08:50pm

I hate spiders. Brown Recluse is the worst species that make their way up to South Dakota from time to time. Hell, might even be the worst type of spider period. Hope I never run into one. Had my share of run ins with some of the others though. Great Gallery!!!

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from bootheel 8/12/2009 at 09:12am

Great article on naasty critters. I was recently stung by a red wasp and while doin gthe pain dance a friend wet some cigarette tobacco and placed it on the sting site. In just a short time I could feel the pain lessening and next day had no pain at all.

Apparently the tobaco poltis draws out the poison and mitigates the severity.

I wonder if this would work as well on other insect bites? Anybody out there have an opinion?

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from Aaron1991 8/10/2009 at 04:14pm

after a couple hunderd fire ant bites you get emune to em

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from Johnnie 7/20/2009 at 05:45pm

In regard to the brown recluse spider: People who use outhouses (as in the days of old) such as backpackers, hikers or others be careful when sitting on the 'toilet seat', that hole in the wood board. Under the planked seat it is dark, "the sun don't shine there" and that is what a recluse spider likes: the dark. You definitely do not want to get bite on your butt. From what I understand the spider can also be found under beds in your home; another dark location.

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from JoshyJoshMcJoshBell 7/16/2009 at 03:47pm

Out of all those deadly insects chiggers are the worse. I think those lil guys are sent from satan. One thing they failed to mention about chiggers is that unlike most of the other insects, they're attracted to your crotch like a heat seeking missile..... Hate em!

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from jacy1515 7/8/2009 at 09:38pm

I was raised in the time before bug dope and on a farm with livestock,My grandfather an old man out of the Ozarks would roll up a cuff on our pants fill it with sulphur and dust our pants up about knee high it worked well.Don't have the ticks chiggers where i am now.We always called em redbugs.The swamps have a lot worse and most you can't even see with a naked eye.Nobody knows your body better than you do.If you don't feel right get it checked.I caught leptosporsis this spring and had never heard of it.

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from lewis 6/28/2009 at 10:31am

Yellowjackets not only sting;they also bite.I'm not sure which one is worse. When I was a kid I walked ontop of a nest and got either stung or bit 18 times. About 25 years ago my girlfriend's mother mowed over a nest and got it 32 times before she could get away. She almost died. They're bad bees.

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from shmo 6/22/2009 at 12:43am

Lyme Disease is very prevalent in CA despite the docotrs opinions or beliefs. Take it seriously - you do not want to mess around with this awful, life changing disease. If you are bit by a tick take it seriously and do not listen to docotrs, other than an LLMD.

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from dickieadams 6/21/2009 at 10:30pm

Did you know the reported Lyme disease cases in dogs are being reported and mapped on a testing equipment company’s website: www.idexx.com? Their reported cases and Lyme disease areas conflict with the CDC information. It will lead you to believe that Lyme disease and other tick-borne infectious diseases are in GEORGIA and other states for man/woman and his/her best friend. Also see: http://www.dogsandticks.com/US-map-lyme-disease-dogs/index.html PROTECT YOURSELF AND YOUR DOG.

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from cedric55 6/20/2009 at 07:17pm

I bet you didn't know that Lyme disease epidemics have been quickly and easily ended in towns in three New England states, did you? One town on Cape Cod ended its Lyme disease over twenty years ago. How? No more deer ticks, therefore no more Lyme disease. Simple enough. Why hasn't your health department informed you about this? Visit EradicateLymeDisease.org and learn more. Liberate your town, or your state from Lyme, the "Unnecesary Epidemic."

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from pmerv 6/20/2009 at 03:28pm

Adult deer ticks or (on the west coast) western black-legged ticks, climb to the tips of vegetation along the edges of trails and "quest." When they sense the CO2 of a mammal approaching, they extend their hooked forelegs and snag a ride as the animal passes by.

Nymphal ticks, thought to be responsible for most human cases of Lyme disease, are found in leaf litter, especially in forests with oak trees (acorns attract tick hosts like mice and deer). Nymphs on the west coast have been found on the tops of downed logs, where they hitch onto lizards, a favored host. They can also climb up to 3 feet on tree trunks, where they sometimes find hunters leaning. Their bite is painless. Gathering firewood has also be linked to higher risk. In California, researchers looking for nymphs in a public picnic area finally found dozens on the underside of the benches and tables.

Only half the people who ultimately are diagnosed with Lyme disease develop any rash at all. Of these, only 9 percent are bull's-eye shape. Most are irregular red areas. Only 14 percent remember being bitten by a tick.

For more information about Lyme, visit www.lymedisease.org and join your local online state support group by going to http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/statenamelyme which will tell you how to find your own group.

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from vagabondh 6/19/2009 at 09:47pm

I believe that ticks are "drop predators", and that they can sense CO2 rising to them, then they drop on the "prey" below them. An exterminator explained that if you want to rid your property of ticks (within practical limits) you need to spray the underside of bushes, tree limbs/leaves, fences, boat trailers - doorways! I am not sure if it varies by the species of tick, though. MAkes perfect sense that every limb brushing on a shoulder deposited the little beasts! Never had them in my yards on on my dogs until a year ago, but the neighbors started fighting them a couple years before that...

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from hanshi 6/19/2009 at 07:48pm

Ticks have to be the worst. They carry more diseases than any other insect including the mosquito. Ticks seem to be everywhere and are very tough to kill or repel. Defeating Lyme should be a national health priority. This one disease causes untold misery and lost productivity in our country.

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from avecsuc 6/19/2009 at 06:36pm

It's good to see people talking about the Lyme issue here. It is so destructive to the person or animal it invades and nothing seems to being done to help those suffering from it. There needs to be more awareness of Lyme and it's co-infections. There is so much needless suffering going on. I am reminded every day that I have to keep searching for a cure, or even a remedy for my 6 year old daughter who is in constant agony. Why can't anyone help her?!?! It is so inhumane!

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from Big O 6/19/2009 at 05:52pm

1) Been "attacked" by fire ants NOT FUN !
2) Had a buddy that was bitten by recluse, developed the "ulcer" Yes it looked like that.
3) Smaller the Scorpion the worse it is for you.
4) HATE tick's & chiggers.
5) Don't mess with catipilar's either.

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from Bo 6/19/2009 at 05:02pm

jmquinn72, there was no need to. The definition of poisonous is "having the properties or qualities of a poison, venomous." The definition of venom is "a poison excreted by some animals, such as insect or snakes, and transmitted by bites or stings." these definitions were from my old beat up copy of "Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary." To try to make that a big issue would have been quibbling on a small point that was not that glaring, as venom is by definition a poison. Under accepted definition venomous snakes may be called poisonous, and vice versa particularly by those that are not versed in medical parlance.
I also referred to bee stings as hymenoptra envenomation, which is a true medical diagnosis.
Also do a search on poisonous snakes and you will see many people use the terms interchangeably. I have heard physicians refer to snakes as poisonous or non-poisonous when talking to non-medical people. I try not to be elitist.
I have better things to do than try to pick articles apart, when the info is good and not technically incorrect. If the information had been wrong to the point of potentially causing harm if one were to follow the advice given, I would have said so, and I have, in other posts.

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from www.dropjhook.com 6/19/2009 at 08:45am

thanks for showing that video dickieadams

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from jmquinn72 6/19/2009 at 07:40am

I'm surprised Bo, the retired ER Nurse, didn't point out the glaring error in an otherwise good article. Poisonous and venomous are different. Generally, a plant or animal is considered poisonous if your are harmed by touching or consuming it. Venomous refers to bugs and insects that deliver their venom, usually with a sting or bite. There are NO poisonous snakes, but there are venomous snakes, for example.

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from Ralph Emerson B... 6/19/2009 at 06:02am

Lyme disease. Until you get it, you just don't understand. It's like a Chronic Wasting disease. Unbelievers, beware! green card lottery.

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from pittpan2005 6/19/2009 at 12:45am

Lyme disease and numerous other dibilitating diseases are transmitted by ticks. Protect yourself. This is an epidemic sweeping across the entire US, not just the Northeast and Midwest. Treat every tick bite as if you are infected with the bacteria. Better to be safe than be disabled for life. Antibiotics immediately!!!!!!!

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from Mike 6/18/2009 at 10:29pm

No Africanized bees? Centipedes? Figure there is just too many critters to cover here.

A friend was bit by a brown recluse in Michigan - it hitched a ride in some packaging from northern Mexico. His arm swelled as big as his leg and he lost some flesh. He was lucky he didn't lose it.

The deer tick concerns me the most. Most people don't realize how tiny they are. Get in your hair and you might never know. A girl that cut my hair came down with Lyme disease - was improperly diagnosed for years. She quit her career because of the complications. She wasn't even an outdoors person - might have just picked up a tick from a client.

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from www.dropjhook.com 6/18/2009 at 10:28pm

I was shed hunting last year within the first mile I pulled off 25 ticks after that I quit counting becuase I would have turned back if I really thought on how bad it was getting. It seem like on they keep getting on my left shoulder almost evrey time my shoulder brushed a branch you guessed it there was at least 1 or 2 of them on my left shoulder again. All I got to say is good times good times.

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from Kody 6/18/2009 at 10:27pm

Twenty three more of those pictures and I would be permanently hold up in my house with cans of Raid stashed strategically around the place, a pocket full of antihistamines, a bottle of calamine lotion and many cases of red wine. Those bugs could give me a whole new appreciation of cold winters. I'm going to plan the rest of my insect defense arsenal over a glass of that red wine and try not to worry!!

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from dickieadams 6/18/2009 at 10:26pm

Babesiosis, Bartonella, Erlichia are tick transmitted infections that can further complicate treatment of Lyme disease. Cases of Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases are being misdiagnosed daily in every state. Research, Education, Prevention, and proper Treatments are desperately needed. I pray everyday for a cure for these dreadful bacterial diseases.

Help! Please contact your U.S. Representatives in support of H.R. 1179...

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from dickieadams 6/18/2009 at 09:21pm

Lyme disease is epedimic across the US. There is a new movie coming out that has been shown to congressmen and medical and other research specialist. The movie titled "Under our skin" from Open Eye Pictures is a very descriptive documentary exposing the damage that chronic Lyme disease can do to its victims when misdiagnosed, untreated and under-treated. OSHA's fact sheet describes Lyme disease "if untreated, can become chronic and disabling." If you have every had a tick bite, you should see this film. An exerpt is available at www.underourskin.com.

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from USMC outdoorsman 6/18/2009 at 07:38pm

I have brown recluses in my house

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from Yoda 6/18/2009 at 06:02pm

Lyme disease keeps getting further and further north every year. I never used to have to worry about it till about 4-5 years ago.

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from Bo 6/18/2009 at 05:39pm

As a retired ER nurse, my perspective on this report, very good. But on Plate # 4, the word is purulent, meaning to contain pus. Pussy is not a medical word and indicative of other things not meant for a family oriented magazine.
Brown recluse are also called fiddlebacks and can cause people loss of a limb, other permanent disability or even death. Many people do not know they have them in their house. If you find one, you will have others. You need a professional exterminator to be sure they are gone. Children and the aged are more severely affected.
I have seen lots of scorpion stings, which are not usually as bad as bee or wasp stings, they hurt, bad.
All of the bee, wasp family are called hymenoptra. People with allergies to hymenoptra envenomation (I am one) can die before your eyes from acute anaphyllactic shock. If they know they are allergic to bees, etc they need to carry a device called an "epi-pen." It can save their life, no epi-pen left at home ever saved anybody.
I used to keep tarantulas, (hey, it kept my apartment safe when I was living in an area with a very high break in rate. Left a tarantula shell in the window, I was left alone when people all around lost almost everything.) Never seen a tarantula bite, You almost have to go out of your way to get them to respond aggressively. I played with them a bunch(when I was single.) Many people have near heart failure when they see them. No one has ever died from an American tarantula bite.
Ticks, Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever are the two big things to worry about, they're both bad.
Black widow bites are again usually only real bad in the very young and the very old. Those in between may have some problems but not usually as bad. I have seen old people die from black widow bites.
It just makes a guy want to go out in the wild, doesn't it. I told my wife the other day, "It's okay, I live with danger every day."
She responded "and occasionally she let's you go hunting." What can I say?

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from firedog11 6/18/2009 at 04:29pm

Great educational series. Some personal points I have been treated twice this year for deer tick bites that became infected and persisted for almost two weeks. I am presently being treated again. If you are in an area where ticks are prevalent (I live in Va.)use plenty of deet on your clothes especially the shoe and cuff area of the pants leg being sure to spray the inside of the pants leg where it meets your shoes or boots. Also I recommend spraying around your belt line. For for neck and hands etc. use one of the natural biological sprays or lotions that contain lemon oil and eucalypetus extract (hope I spelled that right).

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from cjohnsrud 6/18/2009 at 04:15pm

Yikes!! That Brown Recluse is one nasty spider.

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from Bo 6/18/2009 at 05:39pm

As a retired ER nurse, my perspective on this report, very good. But on Plate # 4, the word is purulent, meaning to contain pus. Pussy is not a medical word and indicative of other things not meant for a family oriented magazine.
Brown recluse are also called fiddlebacks and can cause people loss of a limb, other permanent disability or even death. Many people do not know they have them in their house. If you find one, you will have others. You need a professional exterminator to be sure they are gone. Children and the aged are more severely affected.
I have seen lots of scorpion stings, which are not usually as bad as bee or wasp stings, they hurt, bad.
All of the bee, wasp family are called hymenoptra. People with allergies to hymenoptra envenomation (I am one) can die before your eyes from acute anaphyllactic shock. If they know they are allergic to bees, etc they need to carry a device called an "epi-pen." It can save their life, no epi-pen left at home ever saved anybody.
I used to keep tarantulas, (hey, it kept my apartment safe when I was living in an area with a very high break in rate. Left a tarantula shell in the window, I was left alone when people all around lost almost everything.) Never seen a tarantula bite, You almost have to go out of your way to get them to respond aggressively. I played with them a bunch(when I was single.) Many people have near heart failure when they see them. No one has ever died from an American tarantula bite.
Ticks, Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever are the two big things to worry about, they're both bad.
Black widow bites are again usually only real bad in the very young and the very old. Those in between may have some problems but not usually as bad. I have seen old people die from black widow bites.
It just makes a guy want to go out in the wild, doesn't it. I told my wife the other day, "It's okay, I live with danger every day."
She responded "and occasionally she let's you go hunting." What can I say?

+8 Good Comment? | | Report
from dickieadams 6/18/2009 at 10:26pm

Babesiosis, Bartonella, Erlichia are tick transmitted infections that can further complicate treatment of Lyme disease. Cases of Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases are being misdiagnosed daily in every state. Research, Education, Prevention, and proper Treatments are desperately needed. I pray everyday for a cure for these dreadful bacterial diseases.

Help! Please contact your U.S. Representatives in support of H.R. 1179...

+8 Good Comment? | | Report
from firedog11 6/18/2009 at 04:29pm

Great educational series. Some personal points I have been treated twice this year for deer tick bites that became infected and persisted for almost two weeks. I am presently being treated again. If you are in an area where ticks are prevalent (I live in Va.)use plenty of deet on your clothes especially the shoe and cuff area of the pants leg being sure to spray the inside of the pants leg where it meets your shoes or boots. Also I recommend spraying around your belt line. For for neck and hands etc. use one of the natural biological sprays or lotions that contain lemon oil and eucalypetus extract (hope I spelled that right).

+7 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kody 6/18/2009 at 10:27pm

Twenty three more of those pictures and I would be permanently hold up in my house with cans of Raid stashed strategically around the place, a pocket full of antihistamines, a bottle of calamine lotion and many cases of red wine. Those bugs could give me a whole new appreciation of cold winters. I'm going to plan the rest of my insect defense arsenal over a glass of that red wine and try not to worry!!

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike 6/18/2009 at 10:29pm

No Africanized bees? Centipedes? Figure there is just too many critters to cover here.

A friend was bit by a brown recluse in Michigan - it hitched a ride in some packaging from northern Mexico. His arm swelled as big as his leg and he lost some flesh. He was lucky he didn't lose it.

The deer tick concerns me the most. Most people don't realize how tiny they are. Get in your hair and you might never know. A girl that cut my hair came down with Lyme disease - was improperly diagnosed for years. She quit her career because of the complications. She wasn't even an outdoors person - might have just picked up a tick from a client.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ralph Emerson B... 6/19/2009 at 06:02am

Lyme disease. Until you get it, you just don't understand. It's like a Chronic Wasting disease. Unbelievers, beware! green card lottery.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bo 6/19/2009 at 05:02pm

jmquinn72, there was no need to. The definition of poisonous is "having the properties or qualities of a poison, venomous." The definition of venom is "a poison excreted by some animals, such as insect or snakes, and transmitted by bites or stings." these definitions were from my old beat up copy of "Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary." To try to make that a big issue would have been quibbling on a small point that was not that glaring, as venom is by definition a poison. Under accepted definition venomous snakes may be called poisonous, and vice versa particularly by those that are not versed in medical parlance.
I also referred to bee stings as hymenoptra envenomation, which is a true medical diagnosis.
Also do a search on poisonous snakes and you will see many people use the terms interchangeably. I have heard physicians refer to snakes as poisonous or non-poisonous when talking to non-medical people. I try not to be elitist.
I have better things to do than try to pick articles apart, when the info is good and not technically incorrect. If the information had been wrong to the point of potentially causing harm if one were to follow the advice given, I would have said so, and I have, in other posts.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from avecsuc 6/19/2009 at 06:36pm

It's good to see people talking about the Lyme issue here. It is so destructive to the person or animal it invades and nothing seems to being done to help those suffering from it. There needs to be more awareness of Lyme and it's co-infections. There is so much needless suffering going on. I am reminded every day that I have to keep searching for a cure, or even a remedy for my 6 year old daughter who is in constant agony. Why can't anyone help her?!?! It is so inhumane!

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from shmo 6/22/2009 at 12:43am

Lyme Disease is very prevalent in CA despite the docotrs opinions or beliefs. Take it seriously - you do not want to mess around with this awful, life changing disease. If you are bit by a tick take it seriously and do not listen to docotrs, other than an LLMD.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from cjohnsrud 6/18/2009 at 04:15pm

Yikes!! That Brown Recluse is one nasty spider.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Yoda 6/18/2009 at 06:02pm

Lyme disease keeps getting further and further north every year. I never used to have to worry about it till about 4-5 years ago.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from USMC outdoorsman 6/18/2009 at 07:38pm

I have brown recluses in my house

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from dickieadams 6/18/2009 at 09:21pm

Lyme disease is epedimic across the US. There is a new movie coming out that has been shown to congressmen and medical and other research specialist. The movie titled "Under our skin" from Open Eye Pictures is a very descriptive documentary exposing the damage that chronic Lyme disease can do to its victims when misdiagnosed, untreated and under-treated. OSHA's fact sheet describes Lyme disease "if untreated, can become chronic and disabling." If you have every had a tick bite, you should see this film. An exerpt is available at www.underourskin.com.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from cedric55 6/20/2009 at 07:17pm

I bet you didn't know that Lyme disease epidemics have been quickly and easily ended in towns in three New England states, did you? One town on Cape Cod ended its Lyme disease over twenty years ago. How? No more deer ticks, therefore no more Lyme disease. Simple enough. Why hasn't your health department informed you about this? Visit EradicateLymeDisease.org and learn more. Liberate your town, or your state from Lyme, the "Unnecesary Epidemic."

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from bootheel 8/12/2009 at 09:12am

Great article on naasty critters. I was recently stung by a red wasp and while doin gthe pain dance a friend wet some cigarette tobacco and placed it on the sting site. In just a short time I could feel the pain lessening and next day had no pain at all.

Apparently the tobaco poltis draws out the poison and mitigates the severity.

I wonder if this would work as well on other insect bites? Anybody out there have an opinion?

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from rbarker46 8/14/2009 at 04:00pm

Living in the south we have our share of all of the bugs shown in this article. Whenever I go afield I always spray my clothing with Repel's Permanone, which is a permerithin (sp) based product. You can't put it on your skin but it is highly effective on your clothing. I used to get chiggers and ticks but now if they get on my clothing, they die. I use it on my boots, socks, pants and shirt. All of the deet products really don't help with the crawly type bugs. I keep two or three cans at all times, in my truck and 4 wheeler. Believe me it works.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from bigjake 8/16/2009 at 04:16pm

glad i live in the frozen north...just mosquitos to bug us here.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from TheAvonChica 8/16/2009 at 08:34pm

Lyme is beyond an epidemic, and the testing is one of the major problems. They are old, outdated and completely unreliable. The testing used was not even intended for diagnositc use, but for surveillance purposes many years ago. We need a test NOW that actually determines the presence of the lyme bacteria in our bodies 100% of the time. Until we have that, relying on a stand elisa or western blot is as helpfull as tossing a coin.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from teddybearbob 9/17/2009 at 10:16pm

Had a coworker get a recluse bite.Very nasty . No
he didnt develop a "spidey sense ". He caught hell for weeks over it . No one mentioned wasps and bees. They are really agressive this fall. Oven cleaner burns them right up. And chlorinated brake clean. Though its best not to bother them sometimes you have no choice when in auto salvage yards. Its best to be safe than stung.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from philip790 5/28/2010 at 08:23pm

Guys i am happy to say that i live in Canada where we do not have very of these bugs

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from BuckshotandBear 7/3/2010 at 01:01pm

pic 7 looks very painful I feel bad for people who get bit by that

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hunter Girl 1 7/17/2010 at 04:16pm

Now I'm glad I know what one looks like. Thanks.

Hunter Girl 1

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Daniel Ettinger 8/10/2010 at 05:05pm

I was bitten on the ankle by a Brown Recluse when I was fourteen. It put me on crutches for two weeks. I received three shots of Benadryl and at the end, all of the skin on the upper side of my foot peeled off and I had permanent muscle damage behind and above my toes. I was considered lucky not to have lost my foot.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from 1robtdill 8/21/2010 at 03:01pm

I was bitten, last year, by a brown recluse and can testify on the severity of these animals. The bite was on the inside of my right bicep and 36 hrs. after the bite the pain was excruciating and the flesh and muscle was being destroyed along with fever and chills. I spent 2 1/2 days in the hospital going thru 10 bags of I.V. antibotics and vicodin for pain. Not something to mess around with.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from hoveysmith 12/28/2010 at 02:56am

Sometmes you don't know what got you. I was bitten by an African buffalo tick in South Africa. This one hit me under my watchband. This gave an obvious local sore. I immediately started on antibiotics that cured that (available over the counter in SA, even at shops in the airport). That took care of the tick feaver and also apparently got something else, Lyme Disease?, that was making me feel generally run-down, but with no overt sysmptoms. While blanket taking of antibiotics is not recommended for anyone, if you are not feeling good and no one can find anything, this might work.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from pittpan2005 6/19/2009 at 12:45am

Lyme disease and numerous other dibilitating diseases are transmitted by ticks. Protect yourself. This is an epidemic sweeping across the entire US, not just the Northeast and Midwest. Treat every tick bite as if you are infected with the bacteria. Better to be safe than be disabled for life. Antibiotics immediately!!!!!!!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from www.dropjhook.com 6/19/2009 at 08:45am

thanks for showing that video dickieadams

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big O 6/19/2009 at 05:52pm

1) Been "attacked" by fire ants NOT FUN !
2) Had a buddy that was bitten by recluse, developed the "ulcer" Yes it looked like that.
3) Smaller the Scorpion the worse it is for you.
4) HATE tick's & chiggers.
5) Don't mess with catipilar's either.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from hanshi 6/19/2009 at 07:48pm

Ticks have to be the worst. They carry more diseases than any other insect including the mosquito. Ticks seem to be everywhere and are very tough to kill or repel. Defeating Lyme should be a national health priority. This one disease causes untold misery and lost productivity in our country.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from dickieadams 6/21/2009 at 10:30pm

Did you know the reported Lyme disease cases in dogs are being reported and mapped on a testing equipment company’s website: www.idexx.com? Their reported cases and Lyme disease areas conflict with the CDC information. It will lead you to believe that Lyme disease and other tick-borne infectious diseases are in GEORGIA and other states for man/woman and his/her best friend. Also see: http://www.dogsandticks.com/US-map-lyme-disease-dogs/index.html PROTECT YOURSELF AND YOUR DOG.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from lewis 6/28/2009 at 10:31am

Yellowjackets not only sting;they also bite.I'm not sure which one is worse. When I was a kid I walked ontop of a nest and got either stung or bit 18 times. About 25 years ago my girlfriend's mother mowed over a nest and got it 32 times before she could get away. She almost died. They're bad bees.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jacy1515 7/8/2009 at 09:38pm

I was raised in the time before bug dope and on a farm with livestock,My grandfather an old man out of the Ozarks would roll up a cuff on our pants fill it with sulphur and dust our pants up about knee high it worked well.Don't have the ticks chiggers where i am now.We always called em redbugs.The swamps have a lot worse and most you can't even see with a naked eye.Nobody knows your body better than you do.If you don't feel right get it checked.I caught leptosporsis this spring and had never heard of it.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Johnnie 7/20/2009 at 05:45pm

In regard to the brown recluse spider: People who use outhouses (as in the days of old) such as backpackers, hikers or others be careful when sitting on the 'toilet seat', that hole in the wood board. Under the planked seat it is dark, "the sun don't shine there" and that is what a recluse spider likes: the dark. You definitely do not want to get bite on your butt. From what I understand the spider can also be found under beds in your home; another dark location.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from SD_Whitetail_Hntr 8/12/2009 at 08:50pm

I hate spiders. Brown Recluse is the worst species that make their way up to South Dakota from time to time. Hell, might even be the worst type of spider period. Hope I never run into one. Had my share of run ins with some of the others though. Great Gallery!!!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jiffins45 9/4/2009 at 06:28am

Nasty recluse spiders. I think If that happened I'd tell the doc to take of Appendage. More reasons to hate bugs.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from grousesassin 2/4/2010 at 12:39am

i got chiggerfied while on vacation...in Missouri when i was 29 first time i had ever seen a chigger nasty little buggers both my feet and my legs from the knees down looked like the pick only worse itched horribly for 3 months ..chiggers aren't much of an issue here in Minnesota but Ticks and Mosquitoes we have A Plenty.. this summer i had to have a deer tick removed twice from the pubic region they were both dug in deep not pleasent at all

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from turkey777 3/28/2010 at 05:55pm

that is crazy

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kerrie78 10/21/2010 at 04:11pm

I just read the article about deadly bugs. I've been battling apartment bed bugs and if it wasn't for the RPA Rental Authority Website I don't know what I would have done. There'e nothing worse that having hundreds of bugs eating you every night. Finally my bed bugs are gone, but now I'm freaked out about going camping. I don't want some tick to get me. Gross!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Lizzypeacemaker 6/15/2011 at 08:09pm

My dad got bit once by a brown recluse. He got it right on his upper lip! He treated it with hydrogen peroxide for a week and it worked. Although I DO NOT suggest you do the same without doctors permit. My father was lucky to have been able to treat it himself!

Ducks Rule!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from vagabondh 6/19/2009 at 09:47pm

I believe that ticks are "drop predators", and that they can sense CO2 rising to them, then they drop on the "prey" below them. An exterminator explained that if you want to rid your property of ticks (within practical limits) you need to spray the underside of bushes, tree limbs/leaves, fences, boat trailers - doorways! I am not sure if it varies by the species of tick, though. MAkes perfect sense that every limb brushing on a shoulder deposited the little beasts! Never had them in my yards on on my dogs until a year ago, but the neighbors started fighting them a couple years before that...

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from pmerv 6/20/2009 at 03:28pm

Adult deer ticks or (on the west coast) western black-legged ticks, climb to the tips of vegetation along the edges of trails and "quest." When they sense the CO2 of a mammal approaching, they extend their hooked forelegs and snag a ride as the animal passes by.

Nymphal ticks, thought to be responsible for most human cases of Lyme disease, are found in leaf litter, especially in forests with oak trees (acorns attract tick hosts like mice and deer). Nymphs on the west coast have been found on the tops of downed logs, where they hitch onto lizards, a favored host. They can also climb up to 3 feet on tree trunks, where they sometimes find hunters leaning. Their bite is painless. Gathering firewood has also be linked to higher risk. In California, researchers looking for nymphs in a public picnic area finally found dozens on the underside of the benches and tables.

Only half the people who ultimately are diagnosed with Lyme disease develop any rash at all. Of these, only 9 percent are bull's-eye shape. Most are irregular red areas. Only 14 percent remember being bitten by a tick.

For more information about Lyme, visit www.lymedisease.org and join your local online state support group by going to http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/statenamelyme which will tell you how to find your own group.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JoshyJoshMcJoshBell 7/16/2009 at 03:47pm

Out of all those deadly insects chiggers are the worse. I think those lil guys are sent from satan. One thing they failed to mention about chiggers is that unlike most of the other insects, they're attracted to your crotch like a heat seeking missile..... Hate em!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from deersniper 8/20/2009 at 09:28pm

No bug will keep me out of the woods.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dixie Bitch 11/19/2009 at 11:59am

For a bite by a brown recluse I have a remedy that is tested on myself that worked well. Take comfrey root and make a dark tea out of it. In other words put about a hand full in a pint of water and bring it to a boil take it off the heat and over it with a tight lid till it cools. Take your tea and mix a small amout with about a tablespoon of flour, just enough tea to make the flour pasty will do. place that on a 4X4 and apply directly to the bite. cover with about 3 more 4x4s and then wrap with gauze. Change this twice a day. Keep your tea in a tightly closed jar in the refridgerator and it is ok for a week. This poltice draws out the venom and also draws out the necrotic tissue. I know, I used it on a brown recluse bite on myself. I did not want to go through the whole debridement and skin grafting that the doctor said I would have to do. I even shocked the doctor by not needing the medical intervention that he was sure by spider bite would require. It should be noted that the doctor is the one who diagnosed the spider bite as a brown recluse, I had seen the spider after I swatted it but did not know what it was.

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from Browning_300 3/4/2010 at 09:14pm

My uncle was logging here in the Black Hills last summer and was bitten four times by a brown recluse. The doctors didn't understand how he was able to walk into the ER. He was sick for over a month. These invertebrates are some nasty creatures

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from cgull 3/29/2010 at 03:47pm

Being alergic to most of these nasty things i hate em and do my best to keep away from them. The asp or hairy moth can really hurt when it gets inside a shirt where it can leave more stinging hairs that get into to skin and can be so painfull. I still cary scars from fire ant bites on my feet and ankles that will always be there. Fire ants are moving across the US at amazing speeds. I see them in National Forest as well as cow pastures.

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from Old Salts 4/6/2010 at 06:11pm

There is a caterpillar in South America and the hairs are lethal and no antidote for it!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RSL1982 5/21/2010 at 05:25pm

If you have an engourged tick, I have taken rubbing alcohol (don't use beer) and placed it on the tick. The tick begins to suffocate and will back itself out of your skin. This prevents the attempts of pulling the tick and having the head stuck which transmits the disease.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rusty barfoot 6/22/2010 at 06:30pm

Best pic. of a brown recluse.Now I know what one looks like.Thanks

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from BugMan 12/28/2010 at 03:13pm

www.sportsmenscatalog.com has all the repellents and pesticides to protect you from this kind of problem

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from danny61 4/10/2011 at 01:09pm

How to remove a tick http://bit.ly/iaSp3o

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from danny61 4/10/2011 at 01:09pm

How to remove a tick http://bit.ly/iaSp3o

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from Tc505 4/10/2011 at 10:32pm

having lived in missouri I didn't learn about a trick until just before I left there. using a pair of panty hose under your clothing and sprayed down with deet will help avoid some of the nastier tick and chigger bites. however if you are bitten, remove the tick and use preparation H or tronolane on the bite--three times daily for about three days and there should be no more itching!!! skeeter bites and bee stings, take the leaves of a honey suckle vine--not bush. wet them and roll around in your hands and apply to affected area. will relieve the sting. a friend of mine swears by roll on deodorant for wasp and bee stings. not sure if it will work on hornet or yellow jacket stings though but it should help relieve the pain.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from turkeybow 4/11/2011 at 05:30pm

Some helpful information on these nasty critters. However, one thing I did notice is that the author stated that the bite of a Lyme infected tick will result in a red bullseye around the bite. ***NOT ALWAYS*** Last fall I started to experience pain in my shoulders and knees and found that I was more tired than usual. I also experienced some dizziness every once in a while.I spend a lot of time outdoors: scouting, planting and working food plots, putting up treestands, turkey hunting, etc, so I did a little research and found out that all of those symptoms are indicative of Lyme Disease. I went to the Dr. and got tested and found out that I have it. Don't ask me where or when I got bit because I don't know! I was treated with Doxycycline and the symptoms have decreased but some days the knees are still sore! This year I'm spraying all of my clothes with Permethrin!

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from Bob Hansen 4/19/2011 at 06:19pm

I got lyme disease about twenty years ago, before the MDs knew anything helpful about the treatment. I had the "usual" bullseye rash (red circle with a red "bullseye" in the center) on the outside of my left ankle. I don't think I ever had any reason to look there, and it was spotted by someone else, fortunately.

Itched like blazes, and had efter-effects for months afterwards. Even today tests for same canot always be counted on.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from www.dropjhook.com 6/18/2009 at 10:28pm

I was shed hunting last year within the first mile I pulled off 25 ticks after that I quit counting becuase I would have turned back if I really thought on how bad it was getting. It seem like on they keep getting on my left shoulder almost evrey time my shoulder brushed a branch you guessed it there was at least 1 or 2 of them on my left shoulder again. All I got to say is good times good times.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jmquinn72 6/19/2009 at 07:40am

I'm surprised Bo, the retired ER Nurse, didn't point out the glaring error in an otherwise good article. Poisonous and venomous are different. Generally, a plant or animal is considered poisonous if your are harmed by touching or consuming it. Venomous refers to bugs and insects that deliver their venom, usually with a sting or bite. There are NO poisonous snakes, but there are venomous snakes, for example.

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from Aaron1991 8/10/2009 at 04:14pm

after a couple hunderd fire ant bites you get emune to em

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from jdavila11 10/7/2009 at 01:35pm

this was instructional and educational and with this we can watch out for these predators when were out in the outdoors

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tellmeaboutcoyo... 12/15/2009 at 08:28pm

I agree that the brown recluse is one nasty bug, this summer I was laying wires with my Uncle in Kansas. The recluse was what I was watchin out for in the crawl space I was in for awhile.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from blake425 11/23/2010 at 09:27am

That, sir, is why I hate spiders.

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from cheapjerseys 11/23/2010 at 10:14pm

Great educational series.it's awasp not spider.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from hanshi 1/14/2011 at 01:10pm

I'm arachniphobic and even the sight of those things is terrifying. I'll have to admit, though, that ticks top my list of "why do they exist" creatures. With the prevalence of Lyme disease you'd think there would be definitive diagnostics and a vaccine. Medicine is primitive regardless what we've been lead to believe. If as much money were spent on medical research as on social engineering, we'd be in much better shape.

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from Keenan Daniels 1/29/2011 at 03:19am

A good advertisement for extermination of species. And that Brown Recluse is the worse. Yuck.

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from killercatfish 3/20/2011 at 05:34pm

toe biters inject paralyzing venom and they can get as big as a hand. wat make this so deadly is toe biters can fly and swim where humans like to swim.that inclunds michigan and the amazon river. they got there name from biting peoples toes. they drink or eat blood from the animal thay caut. it is ok to swim in michigan because they are barlay seen or found and they like fish more than human toes.

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from Bob Hansen 4/19/2011 at 06:21pm

Regarding Africanized honey bees...beware. They presently exist in parts of our southwest, and now are as far north as Georga...!! Per Georga Public Health.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from hobjogus 12/25/2010 at 04:31pm

OK, there is a simple cure for the brown recluse bite. Two of my friends sons and my wife were bitten by brown recluse and the treatmet we used stoped the spread of the damaged tissue and the bite healed very rapidly. What we do is use a mini stun gun and shock around the bite several times. The electric current changes the venum to protien which the body absorbs.

Go to this web site http://spiderbitetreatment.com/minisguse.htm
where Dr. Stan Abrams explains the treatment.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from killercatfish 3/19/2011 at 11:01pm

sydney funnel web spiders are austalias most deadly animal. its venom can kill a human less than 45 min. thay are more deadly than a great white shark and thay are climing in peoples homes. there jaws are so strong that thay can bite though a human toenail it can cause vomiting and xtreme pian BEWARE OF THE SYDNEY FUNNEL SPIDER

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

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