Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Start a Fire Fast

Start a Fire Fast

Spark rods are the ultimate back-up plan for emergency fire starting. Here's how to use them.
Related Tags:
spark_01

Comments (7)

» Write a Comment
Top Rated
All Comments
from bberg7794 10/21/2011 at 10:19am

The FireSteel (pictures 17 through 19) comes in two models, a "scout" and an "army." I bought the army model after reading several comments about the army model being slightly larger to make it easier to use, especially with cold hands. It definitely throws a lot of sparks.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tc505 4/10/2011 at 10:40pm

I am not sure where to get the strike anywhere's but try some of the dollar stores, they should have them. wally doesn't carry them any more. if you can get some though lay them out and spray with clear lacquer to water proof them. bud k used to have hurricane matches but not sure if they still carry or not. using pjb's is perfect for use but as stated above--carry them away from anything that it will ruin. I usually double bag in zip locks. if nothing else carry seperately a 9 volt battery and some steel wool. makes a very quick hot fire by just rubbing the battery around an edge of it and making contact. fat pine shavings is also very good. carried in a baggie will keep them dry and readily available. a good one handed fire striker is also perfect but needs something for tinder.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from sbuster1 4/10/2011 at 12:29pm

where can I find strike anywhere matches? I used to have some but I can't find them anymore.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from T-Mac 3/29/2011 at 01:33pm

Thanks Smitty!
Petrolium Jelly Cotton Balls (PJB's to me) and Fatwood are staple crops in my survival gear. Just keep the PJB's in something water tite. Not that water will afect them, but if the weather turns hot, the petrolium will melt and run out all over your gear. I had a perfectly good box of matches ruined by hot petrolium grease running down through there and all over everything else in the pack.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Smitty 3/28/2011 at 09:08pm

Great post T-Mac.
I carry several cotton balls swabbed in Vaseline in an old plastic film canister. Weighs nothing and takes up zero room in my survival kit. A few sparks from my flint and whoosh--instant flame that will burn for a good minute or two--plenty of time to lay on kindling.
I also carry a few pieces of Fat Wood (available at Home Depot or just about any hardware store) in a plastic baggie. Peel a few shavings of this on top of one of those cotton balls and you can make a fire anywhere/anytime.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from T-Mac 3/28/2011 at 08:31am

Thanks Bo,
Those are great additions to the piece - to shave the magnesium before you go out, and to pratice your skills before you need them! And no - I wasn't rummaging through your stuff.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bo 3/25/2011 at 10:22pm

If I didn't know better, I would say that MacWelch was going through my own kit... The only things that I will add is that I take my Magnesium firebars and shave them down before I go into the field. I put all of the shavings in a 35mm film canister. (It will not take very much of the bar to fill several of them. THEN when the fan starts spewing that awful brown color, you don't have to shave it down.
I have cut myself pretty good trying to shave one down... I got 8 stitches in my left index finger when the knife slipped. Had I been in a true emergency situation and needed the fire ASAP, that is a mistake that could have been fatal. WIth the shavings in the film canister, all I have to do is put a pinch onto my tinder and I am off and running.
The second and last thing that I will add is IF YOU HAVE THESE TOOLS, PRACTICE WITH THEM AT HOME IN A NON-CRITICAL SITUATION. If the OH CRAP time comes, there will be no stress at the thought of using them. I have never uses matches in my fireplace, only the tools mentioned above and a couple of others that I picked up over the years.
Starting a fire with these tools is like tying my shoes. When I was first learning how, it was hard, same with building a fire with these tools. Now I do not even think about what I must do to tie my shoes or start a fire, it's just I am using a different kind of lacing material.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report

Write a Comment Your comment (200 characters or less):

from Smitty 3/28/2011 at 09:08pm

Great post T-Mac.
I carry several cotton balls swabbed in Vaseline in an old plastic film canister. Weighs nothing and takes up zero room in my survival kit. A few sparks from my flint and whoosh--instant flame that will burn for a good minute or two--plenty of time to lay on kindling.
I also carry a few pieces of Fat Wood (available at Home Depot or just about any hardware store) in a plastic baggie. Peel a few shavings of this on top of one of those cotton balls and you can make a fire anywhere/anytime.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bo 3/25/2011 at 10:22pm

If I didn't know better, I would say that MacWelch was going through my own kit... The only things that I will add is that I take my Magnesium firebars and shave them down before I go into the field. I put all of the shavings in a 35mm film canister. (It will not take very much of the bar to fill several of them. THEN when the fan starts spewing that awful brown color, you don't have to shave it down.
I have cut myself pretty good trying to shave one down... I got 8 stitches in my left index finger when the knife slipped. Had I been in a true emergency situation and needed the fire ASAP, that is a mistake that could have been fatal. WIth the shavings in the film canister, all I have to do is put a pinch onto my tinder and I am off and running.
The second and last thing that I will add is IF YOU HAVE THESE TOOLS, PRACTICE WITH THEM AT HOME IN A NON-CRITICAL SITUATION. If the OH CRAP time comes, there will be no stress at the thought of using them. I have never uses matches in my fireplace, only the tools mentioned above and a couple of others that I picked up over the years.
Starting a fire with these tools is like tying my shoes. When I was first learning how, it was hard, same with building a fire with these tools. Now I do not even think about what I must do to tie my shoes or start a fire, it's just I am using a different kind of lacing material.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from T-Mac 3/29/2011 at 01:33pm

Thanks Smitty!
Petrolium Jelly Cotton Balls (PJB's to me) and Fatwood are staple crops in my survival gear. Just keep the PJB's in something water tite. Not that water will afect them, but if the weather turns hot, the petrolium will melt and run out all over your gear. I had a perfectly good box of matches ruined by hot petrolium grease running down through there and all over everything else in the pack.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from T-Mac 3/28/2011 at 08:31am

Thanks Bo,
Those are great additions to the piece - to shave the magnesium before you go out, and to pratice your skills before you need them! And no - I wasn't rummaging through your stuff.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bberg7794 10/21/2011 at 10:19am

The FireSteel (pictures 17 through 19) comes in two models, a "scout" and an "army." I bought the army model after reading several comments about the army model being slightly larger to make it easier to use, especially with cold hands. It definitely throws a lot of sparks.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from sbuster1 4/10/2011 at 12:29pm

where can I find strike anywhere matches? I used to have some but I can't find them anymore.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tc505 4/10/2011 at 10:40pm

I am not sure where to get the strike anywhere's but try some of the dollar stores, they should have them. wally doesn't carry them any more. if you can get some though lay them out and spray with clear lacquer to water proof them. bud k used to have hurricane matches but not sure if they still carry or not. using pjb's is perfect for use but as stated above--carry them away from anything that it will ruin. I usually double bag in zip locks. if nothing else carry seperately a 9 volt battery and some steel wool. makes a very quick hot fire by just rubbing the battery around an edge of it and making contact. fat pine shavings is also very good. carried in a baggie will keep them dry and readily available. a good one handed fire striker is also perfect but needs something for tinder.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Write a Comment Your comment (200 characters or less):

1 of 20
Rate Galleryor?

Subscribe Now!

Subscribe Now!





bmxbiz