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Rappel Like a Man

Rappel Like a Man

If you spend enough time in the backcountry, you'll eventually run into some steep terrain. Here's how to get down ... and all you need is rope.
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from turtle 6/22/2012 at 10:15am

I liked this article. I too enjoy just using a rope for quick descents around terrain and I try to find good routes. In addition to using a rope I have added a good carabiner and figure 8 to my pack. This combined with knowledge of the swiss seat will allow anyone to repel safely down longer steeper slopes than the Body Rappel. The biner and figure 8 don't weigh much and can get you out of a jam especially if you've been out a while and are tired.

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from 23 4/22/2011 at 02:02pm

I carry 24 ft of rescue rated orange webbing- works as a harness, deer(or other animal) drag rope, tree stand haul rope, emergency splint lash,4 wheeler recovery strap, etc, etc,etc.(if you use it for heavy work-replace it before using it again for life safety) and 150 ft 550 cord and 75 ft 8mm cord, in Ohio it is rare to find a slope with more than 30 feet between anchor points.75 ft gives you 35 feet of vertical distance when wrapped around an anchor point,if you want to retreive your rope that is. I also carry a very light weight(77 grams) descender Omega: SBGII Belay/Rappel Device , being a volunteer fireman I got most of this stuff from The Fire Store.com

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from wgiles 4/16/2011 at 09:18am

Given the choice between rappelling down a cliff and walking down the other side, I'll walk. That said, there are times when you need to descend a slope that is too steep or too loose to walk down with a heavy pack. To that end, I have a 125 foot piece of 7mm accessory cord in my kit. Why 7mm? It's small, but not too small to get a grip on. Doubled, it's about the equivalent of 3/8" rope, the smallest that I would consider rappelling on. 125 feet? It's a compromise. Too long weighs too much, too short won't reach. It's also good for lowering a load, like my pack or a quarter of game. But that's why I have my Para Cord! Come On. Parachute cord is good for lashing and lanyards and a zillion other little things, but it's too small to handle any real loads. The small diameter cuts into your hands and you can't hold on. I've seen this happen too often. Parachute cord is supposed to be 550 pound breaking strength, my PMI 7mm accessory cord is rated at 9.3 Kilo Newtons breaking strength (2090 Lb.)and is just enough larger to be able to hold on to it. Not fun with a heavy load. It would be nice to carry a 200 foot static rope and climbing rack, but I've got too much other stuff to carry.

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from wgiles 4/16/2011 at 09:18am

Given the choice between rappelling down a cliff and walking down the other side, I'll walk. That said, there are times when you need to descend a slope that is too steep or too loose to walk down with a heavy pack. To that end, I have a 125 foot piece of 7mm accessory cord in my kit. Why 7mm? It's small, but not too small to get a grip on. Doubled, it's about the equivalent of 3/8" rope, the smallest that I would consider rappelling on. 125 feet? It's a compromise. Too long weighs too much, too short won't reach. It's also good for lowering a load, like my pack or a quarter of game. But that's why I have my Para Cord! Come On. Parachute cord is good for lashing and lanyards and a zillion other little things, but it's too small to handle any real loads. The small diameter cuts into your hands and you can't hold on. I've seen this happen too often. Parachute cord is supposed to be 550 pound breaking strength, my PMI 7mm accessory cord is rated at 9.3 Kilo Newtons breaking strength (2090 Lb.)and is just enough larger to be able to hold on to it. Not fun with a heavy load. It would be nice to carry a 200 foot static rope and climbing rack, but I've got too much other stuff to carry.

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from 23 4/22/2011 at 02:02pm

I carry 24 ft of rescue rated orange webbing- works as a harness, deer(or other animal) drag rope, tree stand haul rope, emergency splint lash,4 wheeler recovery strap, etc, etc,etc.(if you use it for heavy work-replace it before using it again for life safety) and 150 ft 550 cord and 75 ft 8mm cord, in Ohio it is rare to find a slope with more than 30 feet between anchor points.75 ft gives you 35 feet of vertical distance when wrapped around an anchor point,if you want to retreive your rope that is. I also carry a very light weight(77 grams) descender Omega: SBGII Belay/Rappel Device , being a volunteer fireman I got most of this stuff from The Fire Store.com

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from turtle 6/22/2012 at 10:15am

I liked this article. I too enjoy just using a rope for quick descents around terrain and I try to find good routes. In addition to using a rope I have added a good carabiner and figure 8 to my pack. This combined with knowledge of the swiss seat will allow anyone to repel safely down longer steeper slopes than the Body Rappel. The biner and figure 8 don't weigh much and can get you out of a jam especially if you've been out a while and are tired.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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