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Conflict

Rappel Like a Man

If you spend enough time in the backcountry, you'll eventually run into some steep terrain. Here's how to get down ... and all you need is rope.

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Survive Political Hot Spots

When a country is thrown into turmoil things can get ugly. Here's a guide that will show you how to escape alive.

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Conflict Articles

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Surviving the Undead

Shooting Editor John Snow showcases his choices of guns for surviving the zombie...

Prepare for a Social Collapse

Follow these tips and you'll survive even the worst-case scenarios.

Video

Below you will be able to view a series of videos about the Florida Keys, a renowned fishing destination. As soon as one video ends, the next one will automatically play.

  • February 7, 2014

    Survival Gear: Make a Fire Piston from a Maglite - 0

    For those who are unfamiliar with the use and action of a fire piston, it really is a fascinating device. The basic operation of this fire starter involves a piston slammed down into a sleeve, which generates heat and ignites some tinder imbedded at the piston’s tip. This compression ignition system should sound familiar to anyone who’s familiar with the diesel engine. Legend has it that German inventor and mechanical engineer Rudolf Diesel got the idea for his famous engine by watching a fire piston in operation.

    A few weeks ago, my friend Roger showed me his repurposed Mini Maglite, which is now a fully functional fire piston. It only required a few steps and it’s a really neat project, for kids and grownups alike. Here’s how you can make your own fire piston this weekend from an old Mini Maglite body and a some basic materials from the hardware store.

    The Materials
    [ Read Full Post ]


  • February 6, 2014

    Survival Skills: Be Ready for Ice Storms - 4


    CC image from Wikipedia

    You have to laugh at the irony that life hands you. As I write this piece on ice storm preparedness, my area is in the midst of an ice storm. Good thing I planned ahead. Winter ice storms can be a tricky natural hazard to navigate. At best, an ice storm leaves you cooped up in your home with a full pantry and all utilities operating normally. On your worst day, utilities are out, supplies are low, and you can’t even step out the door without slipping and busting your skull. Your best bet is to hunker down and ride it out. But you’ll need some supplies for that. Here’s what you need to have in order before the next batch of icy weather hits your hometown. [ Read Full Post ]


  • February 4, 2014

    Survival Skills: How to Make Waterproof Matches - 1

    When it comes to matches, waterproof ones are best, especially in dire circumstances like a flood. Since they're much more expensive than their pedestrian cousins, you might want to make your own.

    Use the Candle Technique
    Burn a candle long enough for a pool of wax to form around the wick. Blow it out, then dip the head of your match into the wet wax, about of an inch (3 mm) up the stick. Remove the matchstick and allow the wax to dry, pinching it closed to form a water-tight seal. [ Read Full Post ]


  • February 3, 2014

    Man Spends Over a Year Adrift at Sea, Or Maybe Not? - 1

    Could you survive at sea for a year, by yourself, in an open boat with no fishing gear? Last Friday, a strange tale of unlikely survival began to circulate. This story revolved around a man who was reportedly rescued after being adrift in the Pacific for more than a year, according to the AFP.

    The man, who initially identified himself by the name Jose Ivan, was rescued by two locals last Thursday near Ebon Atoll. This tiny coral island is in the southernmost part of the Marshall Islands, roughly 8,000 miles from the purported beginning of this man’s journey from Mexico. During his debriefing with local officials, he admitted that his name was Jose Salvador Albarengo, and he began his shark fishing voyage with another man, a teenager known by the name of Xiquel. After strong weather blew their 24-foot fiberglass boat off course, they were soon lost in the Pacific. Albarengo claimed that the teen had starved to death after only a few weeks, refusing to eat the raw birds and other food they were catching. [ Read Full Post ]


  • February 3, 2014

    Survival Skills: How to Make Improvised Snowshoes - 0

    Walking through deep snow is tough work that will drain you of crucial energy. These snowshoes will help you glide across—not plow through—the snow's surface.

    Step One
    Start by cutting two pine boughs with ample foliage to about 3 feet (1 m) long.

    Step Two
    Tie a string near the base of the branch, where you cut it. Then flip the branch over and tie an overhand knot on the opposite side. [ Read Full Post ]


  • January 31, 2014

    Survival Skills: Prep Your Bug Out Bag For Winter - 0

    Since a good bug out bag is supposed to provide the most basic needs of its owner and reflect the most likely emergency scenarios, it should be modified throughout the year to match the current season. Just as your sleeping bag and clothing choices change from summer excursions to winter campouts, so should the contents of your bug out bag. If you’re forward thinking enough to own a B.O.B., then consider altering it in these three areas for the dead of winter.  [ Read Full Post ]


  • January 30, 2014

    Survival Skills: How to Build a Swamp Shelter - 0

    You're in the swamp. The ground is wet. The air is wet. And the vegetation is bloated with water, which makes it a poor building material. As a result, one of the most challenging things to do is erect a dry shelter.

    Step One
    Find a dry spot. Of course, "dry" is relative, but a slight hill should be less wet than areas of lower elevation. It's also a good idea to learn how to spot and avoid run-offs. These sparsely vegetated, eroded spots are prone to flash floods, so they're not ideal for a shelter, especially when rainfall is likely. [ Read Full Post ]


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