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Gear

The Bug Out Bag

What if you had only three minutes to grab whatever you could take from your home, and the rest of your belongings would be lost forever?
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Best Survival Guns

These guns will help keep you alive when the going gets rough.

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Gear Articles

The Bug Out Bag

What if you had only three minutes to grab whatever you could take from your home, and the...

Survivalist Wish List

A roundup of the best and most innovative survival gear ever introduced.

Water Filtration Test

Aron Snyder hiked into the backcountry to test water filtration systems.

Big Ass Knives

Snow's favorite big blades, modeled by the hottest hunters on OL's staff.

Game Faces

Eight watches that do much more than just give you the time of day

Knife Test

Survival knives have advanced with new steel recipes and synthetic materials.

Video

Below you will be able to view a series of videos about the Florida Keys, a renowned fishing destination. As soon as one video ends, the next one will automatically play.

  • June 18, 2014

    Survival Skills: 3 Tricks With Matches - 2

    Talk about a survival story: A full century has passed since the invention of the lighter, yet matches remain a staple in survival kits. Lighters last longer and can resist water better, but there’s something about matches that keeps them in circulation.

    Maybe it’s the fact that they’re plentiful and often can be obtained for no charge from bars, restaurants, and some stores. Or maybe people like matches for nostalgia reasons. Whatever your fixation, here are three match tricks that will give you a boost when you’re down to your last box or book. [ Read Full Post ]


  • June 11, 2014

    Survival Skills: 5 Uses For Mulberry Fruit - 2

    Has it really been a year since we saw the last mulberries? For most of us in the lower 48, the mulberry is the first ripe berry of summer, but it’s only here for a couple of weeks. There are three species you’ll find scattered across the U.S.—the black mulberry (Morus nigra), the white mulberry (Morus alba), and the red mulberry (Morus rubra). The red species is native to North America, while the other two are native to southwestern Asia. You’ll find these imports throughout the country, as they were brought here to create silk in the New World (silk worms live on mulberry leaves exclusively). We can’t eat the leaves, but the ripe fruit is a great snack for humans, right off the tree. These blackberry-like morsels provide 60 calories per cup, with 85 percent of your daily requirement of Vitamin C and 14 percent of your daily Iron. Make sure they are ripe and sweet, because under-ripe mulberries can lead to serious reactions like vomiting, diarrhea, and hallucinations. [ Read Full Post ]


  • June 9, 2014

    Survival Skills: 10 Steps to Light a One-Match Fire - 1

    Looking for a way to test your fire-building skills? How about lighting a one-match fire? This feat is even more impressive in wet conditions, windy weather, and in other scenarios that increase the difficulty level. If you want to make sure you can pass this fire-starting test with flying colors, be sure to use the following guidelines.

    1. Pay attention to detail. One-match fires work best when you’re certain that each part of the operation is as flawless as possible. Everything from striking the match to building your fire lay should be executed smoothly and flawlessly. [ Read Full Post ]


  • June 6, 2014

    Survival Gear Review: The Vulture Cholera Knife - 3

    Earlier this year, Vulture Equipment Works debuted their new Cholera fixed-blade knife at SHOT Show, where it was declared “People's Choice Knife Shot Show 2014.” That’s quite an endorsement, but will I make this knife my choice for a wilderness EDC blade? Follow along and find out.

    First things first, I had to ask what was up with the name “Cholera?” Normally you’d want to avoid something like cholera, right? It turns out that this catchy bug is one of many pathogens that can live in the guts of a vulture (the company’s “mascot”). President and Chief Designer of Vulture, William Egbert Jr., spent years of R&D coming up with this wicked blade design, and he says a nasty knife name was just what he wanted. Fair enough. [ Read Full Post ]


  • June 5, 2014

    Survival Skills: Make Your Own Primitive Fish Hooks - 0

    Gorge hooks may well be the oldest style of fish hooks on earth. They can be made from a wide range of materials and they can be surprisingly effective, though they are not suitable for catch-and-release. But that’s okay: We’re going to talk about them as a survival tool, so throwing back fish would be counter-productive.

    The function of these hooks is pretty straightforward. Your goal is to entice the fish to swallow a pointed object that will lodge in the soft tissues of its stomach or esophagus, allowing you to land the fish. Bait is usually involved, but the technique is different from those employed in modern fishing. [ Read Full Post ]


  • June 3, 2014

    10 Survival Uses For Oil - 1

    Household oil might not strike you as a key survival item, but it can play a wide variety of roles in emergencies. It’s usually most important as a calorie source, but even rancid or out-of-date oil can still serve useful roles. Here are ten good reasons to add oil to your survival stash.

    1. Calories: Fats are the most dense source of calories, more so than carbs or protein, and in an emergency every calorie counts. Add a little oil to other foods to spike up the calorie content. [ Read Full Post ]


  • June 2, 2014

    Survival Tip #183: Make A Cardboard Box Smoker - 0

    Editor's Note: This tip comes from our new "Prepare for Anything Survival Manual."

    When it comes to smokers, you can spend a lot of money buying one in a store. Restaurants will spend thousands on elaborate smokers. But you can make a backyard smoker out of just about any box, including cardboard.

    First, you need a box no more than 4 feet (1.2 m) tall and 2 feet (0.6 m) wide. Cut a door in the bottom of one side to remove and reload wood chips during cooking. Next, insert two parallel dowel rods through the box at 12 and 36 inches (30 and 90 cm). You’ll place your racks (one pan to catch drippings and a wire rack to hold food) on top of the dowels. [ Read Full Post ]


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