Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Natural Disasters

Flood Survival

Statistically, floods are the most devastating natural disasters.

[View Gallery]

Weather Warnings

If you’re caught on the water without a barometer, look for nature’s clues to approaching weather.

[View Gallery]

Latest Videos

http://ak.c.ooyala.com/A2djdnazp4p-Ro55thQ86jYDmePt9er2/QCdjB5HwFOTaWQ8X4xMDoxOjA4MTsiGN

Natural Disasters Articles

Survival Q&A

You've got questions, our survival expert's got answers.

Surviving a Wildfire

Escaping a forest fire demands keen awareness and quick thinking.

Stranded and Alone

What to do if you become stuck with your vehicle in the middle of nowhere.

Snow and Ice Survival

If the winter weather has you trapped, would you be able to make it out alive?

Hurricane Guide

Our comprehensive guide will teach you how to stay safe when a hurricane hits.

Flood Survival

Statistically, floods are the most devastating natural disasters.

Video

Below you will be able to view a series of videos about the Florida Keys, a renowned fishing destination. As soon as one video ends, the next one will automatically play.

  • February 19, 2014

    Survival Skills: 4 Ways to Build a Fire Without a Match - 1

    Even if you don't have matches or a lighter, you can still spark a blaze with the right tools and techniques. Be sure to have your tinder bundle, kindling, and fuel wood ready before you start.

    Bow Drill Method

    Notch a board or a flat piece of bark. To make a bow, stretch a string between the ends of a flexible branch and tie it in place, then use a second stick as a vertical spindle. Place the spindle inside the bow with one end in the notched base. Turn the bow once to loop the string around the spindle, then hold the spindle's other end in place with a stone. Place a leaf under the notch and saw back and forth to create a coal. Then move it to the tinder bundle, and blow gently into flame. [ Read Full Post ]


  • February 18, 2014

    Survival Skill: 10 Ways Snow Can Keep You Alive - 0

    A white-out storm during a hunt or a vehicle stuck in a snow drift can often lead to a deadly serious situation. But, strangely, that same snow is a versatile and useful substance that can help to get you out of trouble. Here are my ten favorite ways to use snow for survival purposes. Your first concern in an emergency is shelter. Snow can be turned into many styles of survival shelter. From igloos and quinzees to snow caves and tree wells, a shelter of snow can mean survival on a sub-zero night.

    Your second survival priority is water, which snow can also provide. Just be sure to melt it first for safe consumption. Boil the water if the snow is old and potentially contaminated by animals.   [ Read Full Post ]


  • February 15, 2014

    Step-By-Step: How to Tie the Fisherman's Knot - 0

    Got two short ropes, but need a long one? A fisherman's knot can join the short ones together.

    Step One

    Loop one rope's end around the other rope, then bring it over both ropes. [ Read Full Post ]


  • February 14, 2014

    Survival Gear Review: Zippo Outdoor 4-in-1 Woodsman - 0

    Feeding your campfire and pitching your shelter are major chores for both recreational camping and survival scenarios. The new 4-in-1 Woodsman from Zippo Outdoor was built to handle many outdoor tasks with just one easy-to-modify tool. So how did it work in my camp?

    Right out of the package, the Woodsman was easy to handle and had enough heft to chop respectably. The entire tool weighs 2 pounds 13 ounces, making it a little heavy for backpacking, but plenty light enough to take to deer camp or for strapping onto a Bug Out Bag. The ax handle seemed a bit long, but the 20-inch length is necessary to accommodate a saw blade of decent length. [ Read Full Post ]


  • February 13, 2014

    Survival Skills: How to Find and Use Birch Tinder Fungus - 2

    Birch tinder fungus (Inonotus obliquus) is a woody type of fungus that grows on a variety of species of birch trees. You’ll find this crusty, black growth primarily on yellow birch and white birch trees, often at higher elevations. And if you’re looking for something raw from the wild that catches sparks like char cloth, this is it.

    Although birch tinder fungus (also known as clinker polypore and chaga) is often used for alternative medicine treatments, its value for survival fire starting really puts it on the map. This punky material is better than traditional char cloth, even without being charred. Here’s where you’ll find it, and how to make it work. [ Read Full Post ]


  • February 10, 2014

    How to Make Sycamore Syrup, Easy And Cheap - 0

    If you’re familiar with the practices of maple sugaring, then it’s an easy transition to the sycamore tree as a sap source. The act of collecting sap for drinking water and syrup dates back centuries, and it is still a valid way to get some calories and clean water, whether you’re in survival mode or tapping your backyard trees for fun.

    The native range of the American sycamore tree covers much of the eastern U.S., although you can purchase seedlings from tree growers and plant them virtually anywhere in the lower 48. Sycamores can be found growing wild in all states east of the Great Plains, except for Minnesota. Sycamore (Platanus occidentalis) is very easy to spot in winter, even at a distance. [ Read Full Post ]


  • February 7, 2014

    Winter Survival Tip: Hole Up in a Tree Well - 0

    Snow is not necessarily an enemy in a blizzard. It's a great insulator, and if you build a proper snow shelter, it'll keep you safe and warm for a short period.

    You can quickly make an effective snow shelter in a tree well (the depression in snow around a tree trunk formed by the protective canopy of branches above it). [ Read Full Post ]


Page 5 of 38« First‹ Previous123456789Next ›Last »
bmxbiz