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Urban

Burglar-Proof a Home

Take steps to keep your home and belongings safe.

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Snow and Ice Survival

If the winter weather has you trapped, would you be able to make it out alive?

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Urban Articles

First Response

Sprains and fractures are common injuries that require swift attention.

Meet Tim MacWelch

This survival expert brings 23 years of experience to OL Survival.

The Silent Killer

Carbon-monoxide poisoning is a real threat for outdoorsmen.

Make a Family Emergency Plan

Make sure your family is prepared for anything.

Snowbound Car

Winter storms can move in without warning, catching you unprepared.

Burglar-Proof a Home

Take steps to keep your home and belongings safe.

Video

Below you will be able to view a series of videos about the Florida Keys, a renowned fishing destination. As soon as one video ends, the next one will automatically play.

  • December 10, 2013

    Survival Medicine: Don’t Fall For Immersion Foot - 0

    Frostbite is a scary, injury that can cause permanent damage and is a constant threat in sub-freezing winter conditions. But did you know that moisture combined with cool temperatures can give you similar damage to frostbite—at temperatures above freezing?

    This condition is commonly known as immersion foot, and it is a chronic issue for cold-weather outdoorsmen and many homeless people. If the skin on your feet (or other extremities) is subject to days of uninterrupted moisture and cold temperatures between 32 and 50  degrees, the tissue can swell and shrivel; and some of the tissue can even die. This damage is similar to frostbite injuries, though immersion foot tends to sneak up on its victims, as opposed to the rapid harm and obvious surface symptoms of frostbite. The tissue does not freeze with immersion foot, but the circulatory, nerve, and skin damage can still be significant. [ Read Full Post ]


  • December 2, 2013

    Survival Gear: Grate Chef Firestarter Packets - 3

    Considering the wintery weather we are already encountering in late fall this year, you better be ready to do some fire building in the event you get into trouble over the next few months. Cold, wet, and windy conditions make fire building a very difficult chore. Use this time to stock up on lighters, matches, and various forms of tinder and fuel to add to your emergency equipment. When it comes to fuel, it’s hard to beat the good old cotton ball soaked in petroleum jelly, but Grate Chef FireStarter packets make a great back up. [ Read Full Post ]


  • November 25, 2013

    Survival Skills: How to Identify and Treat Hypothermia - 2

    Every outdoor enthusiast has probably had a touch of hypothermia at one point or another, and perhaps you’ve had more than just a touch. This dangerous cooling of the body occurs when a person’s body core temperature drops below 95  degrees Fahrenheit.

    Water, wind, and cold temperatures can work against you, causing the loss of critical body heat. But how do you spot this condition in yourself or others? [ Read Full Post ]


  • November 21, 2013

    Survival Gear Review: The Streamlight Microstream Flashlight - 0

    LED flashlights have come a long way over the past few years, and shrunk in both size and price. I recently received the Streamlight Microstream as a gift (thanks, Wes!) and here’s what I thought of it. Spoiler alert: great stocking stuffer, if you’re planning that far ahead already.

    From the size of the light and the AAA battery enclosed in the package, I was expecting the Microstream to perform like a typical keychain light: Handy, but for short-range use only. But when I installed the battery and clicked it on, I realized that this little sucker is bright. [ Read Full Post ]


  • November 20, 2013

    Survival Skills: 3 Ways To Improve Signaling Equipment - 2

    Since signaling for help is your ticket to getting home, it makes sense that your signaling gear should work to its fullest potential. Just a few little tweaks can get your gear working harder and signaling farther. Here are three handy options for common signal equipment. Let’s just hope we never need them. [ Read Full Post ]


  • November 19, 2013

    Survival Tips: 5 Important First-Aid Items To Replace - 1

    A first aid kit is an essential piece of survival gear, and keeping it stocked and accessible is a must. But what happens when your good intentions go wrong? Perhaps someone you are treating is allergic to something in your kit. Or what you are doing just isn’t helping. You may be doing more harm than good.

    Here are five important items in a first aid kit to consider replacing: [ Read Full Post ]


  • November 14, 2013

    Survival Gear Review: The Chinook BleederPAK Trauma Kit - 0

    Traumatic injuries can end lives in minutes. Gunshot wounds, deep punctures, and long lacerations can leave the unprepared person helpless as precious blood spills onto the ground. These types of injuries require specialized gear, like the kind found in the new Chinook BleederPAK ($30).

    Why carry a separate trauma kit? There are a number of good reasons to have this type of gear in its own container. First, it speeds up first aid application. You have the needed supplies in one pouch ready to go at a moment’s notice. Another point to consider is if someone is bleeding profusely, you’re going to get blood (and maybe other fluids) on all of the gear in a single-compartment medical bag. [ Read Full Post ]


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